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foraging

[fawr-i-jing, for-] /ˈfɔr ɪ dʒɪŋ, ˈfɒr-/
noun
1.
the acquisition of food by hunting, fishing, or the gathering of plant matter.
adjective
2.
characterized by or dependent upon the acquisition of food by such means; food-gathering:
a foraging people.

forage

[fawr-ij, for-] /ˈfɔr ɪdʒ, ˈfɒr-/
noun
1.
food for horses or cattle; fodder; provender.
2.
the seeking or obtaining of such food.
3.
the act of searching for provisions of any kind.
4.
a raid.
verb (used without object), foraged, foraging.
5.
to wander or go in search of provisions.
6.
to search about; seek; rummage; hunt:
He went foraging in the attic for old mementos.
7.
to make a raid.
verb (used with object), foraged, foraging.
8.
to collect forage from; strip of supplies; plunder:
to forage the countryside.
9.
to supply with forage.
10.
to obtain by foraging.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English < Old French fourrage, derivative of fuerre fodder (< Gmc)
Related forms
forager, noun
unforaged, adjective
Synonyms
1. See feed.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for foraging
  • Numerical study of foraging behavior with short and long range movement in heterogeneous environments.
  • Every rubbish skip has ragged children in it, foraging for lunch.
  • foraging can be a risky business: in some municipalities, it's not allowed in public parks.
  • Partner penguins didn't compensate by spending more time foraging for food or bringing back extra fish.
  • Theories about foraging say that animals should stick with the proverbial bird in the hand, especially when it comes to food.
  • foraging people everywhere ate what was available to them.
  • Urban found that foraging activity varied greatly from pond to pond.
  • Fires in these areas seemed to boost their foraging success.
  • The war allegedly started because a foraging pig ruined a garden.
  • The quest for new food items is popular anyway, and foraging has become a gourmet hobby.
British Dictionary definitions for foraging

forage

/ˈfɒrɪdʒ/
noun
1.
food for horses or cattle, esp hay or straw
2.
the act of searching for food or provisions
3.
(military) a raid or incursion
verb
4.
to search (the countryside or a town) for food, provisions, etc
5.
(intransitive) (military) to carry out a raid
6.
(transitive) to obtain by searching about
7.
(transitive) to give food or other provisions to
8.
(transitive) to feed (cattle or horses) with such food
Derived Forms
forager, noun
Word Origin
C14: from Old French fourrage, probably of Germanic origin; see food, fodder
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for foraging

forage

n.

early 14c. (late 13c. as Anglo-Latin foragium), from Old French forrage "fodder, foraging, pillaging, looting" (12c., Modern French fourrage), from fuerre "hay, straw, forage, fodder" (Modern French feurre) "fodder, straw," from Frankish *fodr "food" or a similar Germanic source (cf. Old High German fuotar, Old English fodor); see fodder). Military forage cap attested by 1827.

v.

early 15c., from Middle French fourrager, from fourage (Old French forrage; see forage (n.)). Related: Foraged; foraging.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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