forcer

forcer

1 [fawr-ser, fohr-]
noun
a person or thing that forces.

Origin:
1550–60; force + -er1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

forcer

2 [fawr-ser, fohr-]
noun Archaic.
a coffer or chest.

Origin:
1300–50; Middle English < Old French

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
force1 (fɔːs)
 
n
1.  strength or energy; might; power: the force of the blow; a gale of great force
2.  exertion or the use of exertion against a person or thing that resists; coercion
3.  physics
 a.  a dynamic influence that changes a body from a state of rest to one of motion or changes its rate of motion. The magnitude of the force is equal to the product of the mass of the body and its acceleration
 b.  F a static influence that produces an elastic strain in a body or system or bears weight
4.  physics any operating influence that produces or tends to produce a change in a physical quantity: electromotive force; coercive force
5.  a.  intellectual, social, political, or moral influence or strength: the force of his argument; the forces of evil
 b.  a person or thing with such influence: he was a force in the land
6.  vehemence or intensity: he spoke with great force
7.  a group of persons organized for military or police functions: armed forces
8.  informal (sometimes capital) the force the police force
9.  a group of persons organized for particular duties or tasks: a workforce
10.  criminal law violence unlawfully committed or threatened
11.  philosophy, logic speech act illocution See perlocution that which an expression is normally used to achieve
12.  in force
 a.  (of a law) having legal validity or binding effect
 b.  in great strength or numbers
13.  join forces to combine strengths, efforts, etc
 
vb
14.  to compel or cause (a person, group, etc) to do something through effort, superior strength, etc; coerce
15.  to acquire, secure, or produce through effort, superior strength, etc: to force a confession
16.  to propel or drive despite resistance: to force a nail into wood
17.  to break down or open (a lock, safe, door, etc)
18.  to impose or inflict: he forced his views on them
19.  to cause (plants or farm animals) to grow or fatten artificially at an increased rate
20.  to strain or exert to the utmost: to force the voice
21.  to rape; ravish
22.  cards
 a.  to compel (a player) to trump in order to take a trick
 b.  to compel a player by the lead of a particular suit to play (a certain card)
 c.  (in bridge) to induce (a bid) from one's partner by bidding in a certain way
23.  force a smile to make oneself smile
24.  force down to compel an aircraft to land
25.  force the pace to adopt a high speed or rate of procedure
 
[C13: from Old French, from Vulgar Latin fortia (unattested), from Latin fortis strong]
 
'forceable1
 
adj
 
'forceless1
 
adj
 
'forcer1
 
n
 
'forcingly1
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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