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foreboding

[fawr-boh-ding, fohr-] /fɔrˈboʊ dɪŋ, foʊr-/
noun
1.
a prediction; portent.
2.
a strong inner feeling or notion of a future misfortune, evil, etc.; presentiment.
adjective
3.
that forebodes, especially evil.
Origin of foreboding
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English forbodyng (noun); see forebode, -ing1, -ing2
Related forms
forebodingly, adverb
forebodingness, noun
unforeboding, adjective
Can be confused
forbidding, foreboding.

forebode

[fawr-bohd, fohr-] /fɔrˈboʊd, foʊr-/
verb (used with object), foreboded, foreboding.
1.
to foretell or predict; be an omen of; indicate beforehand; portend:
clouds that forebode a storm.
2.
to have a strong inner feeling or notion of (a future misfortune, evil, catastrophe, etc.); have a presentiment of.
verb (used without object), foreboded, foreboding.
3.
to prophesy.
4.
to have a presentiment.
Origin
1595-1605; fore- + bode1
Related forms
foreboder, noun
unforeboded, adjective
Can be confused
forbade, forbid, forbidden, forebode.
Synonyms
1. foreshadow, presage, forecast, augur.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for foreboding
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Anxious to know the reason of his following us, which I had a foreboding was connected with my camel, I hastened to the spot.

    The Pacha of Many Tales Frederick Marryat
  • The foreboding was not as definite, but it was always with him; he could not shake it off.

    Shavings Joseph C. Lincoln
  • The Virgin is holding up the Child close to her beautiful face; she broods over him, and the countenance is full of foreboding.

    Donatello David Lindsay, Earl of Crawford
  • Instead of being glum and pessimistic and foreboding, he was chipper and enthusiastic.

    Masters of Space Edward Elmer Smith
  • So Gourlay trudged home through the darkness, beaten at last, mad with shame and anger and foreboding.

    The House with the Green Shutters George Douglas Brown
British Dictionary definitions for foreboding

foreboding

/fɔːˈbəʊdɪŋ/
noun
1.
a feeling of impending evil, disaster, etc
2.
an omen or portent
adjective
3.
presaging something
Derived Forms
forebodingly, adverb
forebodingness, noun

forebode

/fɔːˈbəʊd/
verb
1.
to warn of or indicate (an event, result, etc) in advance
2.
to have an intuition or premonition of (an event)
Derived Forms
foreboder, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for foreboding
n.

late 14c., "a predilection, portent, omen," from fore- + verbal noun from bode. Meaning "sense of something bad about to happen" is from c.1600. Old English forebodung meant "prophecy."

forebode

v.

"feel a secret premonition," c.1600, from fore- + bode. Related: Foreboded; foreboding. Old English forebodian meant "to announce, declare."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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