foundation

[foun-dey-shuhn]
noun
1.
the basis or groundwork of anything: the moral foundation of both society and religion.
2.
the natural or prepared ground or base on which some structure rests.
3.
the lowest division of a building, wall, or the like, usually of masonry and partly or wholly below the surface of the ground.
4.
the act of founding, setting up, establishing, etc.: a policy in effect since the foundation.
5.
the state of being founded.
6.
an institution financed by a donation or legacy to aid research, education, the arts, etc.: the Ford Foundation.
7.
an endowment for such an institution.
8.
a cosmetic, as a cream or liquid, used as a base for facial makeup.
10.
Solitaire. a card of given denomination on which other cards are to be added according to denomination or suit.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English foundacioun < Latin fundātiōn- (stem of fundātiō), equivalent to fundāt(us) (past participle of fundāre; see found2) + -iōn- -ion

foundational, adjective
foundationally, adverb
foundationary, adjective
prefoundation, noun


2. See base1. 2, 3. footing. 4, 5. establishment, settlement.


2, 3. superstructure.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
foundation (faʊnˈdeɪʃən)
 
n
1.  that on which something is founded; basis
2.  (often plural) a construction below the ground that distributes the load of a building, wall, etc
3.  the base on which something stands
4.  the act of founding or establishing or the state of being founded or established
5.  a.  an endowment or legacy for the perpetual support of an institution such as a school or hospital
 b.  on the foundation entitled to benefit from the funds of a foundation
6.  an institution supported by an endowment, often one that provides funds for charities, research, etc
7.  the charter incorporating or establishing a society or institution and the statutes or rules governing its affairs
8.  a cosmetic in cream or cake form used as a base for make-up
9.  See foundation garment
10.  cards a card on which a sequence may be built
 
foun'dational
 
adj
 
foun'dationally
 
adv
 
foun'dationary
 
adj

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

foundation
late 14c., "action of founding," from L. fundationem (nom. fundatio) "a founding," from fundatus, pp. of fundare (see found (1)). The L. word is glossed in O.E. by staþol. Meaning "that which is founded" (a college, hospital, etc.) is from 1510s; meaning "funds endowed"
is early 15c. Sense of "solid base of a structure" is from late 15c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

foundation foun·da·tion (foun-dā'shən)
n.
The basis on which something stands or is supported; a base.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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FOLDOC
Computing Dictionary

foundation definition


The axiom of foundation states that the membership relation is well founded, i.e. that any non-empty collection Y of sets has a member y which is disjoint from Y. This rules out sets which contain themselves (directly or indirectly).

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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Example sentences
The melting of ice-rich permafrost can destroy the physical foundation of
  everything above: tundra and forests, houses and roads.
The foundation hopes this will encourage other providers of capital to overcome
  their fears and put their money at risk.
Foundation money is also supporting academic researchers studying the effects
  of climate change and ways to reduce pollution.
To spectators, the stadium was a microcosm of the empire, and its games a
  re-enactment of their foundation myths.
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