furtive

[fur-tiv]
adjective
1.
taken, done, used, etc., surreptitiously or by stealth; secret: a furtive glance.
2.
sly; shifty: a furtive manner.

Origin:
1480–90; < Latin furtīvus, equivalent to furt(um) theft (compare fūr thief) + -īvus -ive

furtively, adverb
furtiveness, noun


1. clandestine, covert. 2. underhand, cunning.
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World English Dictionary
furtive (ˈfɜːtɪv)
 
adj
characterized by stealth; sly and secretive
 
[C15: from Latin furtīvus stolen, clandestine, from furtum a theft, from fūr a thief; related to Greek phōr thief]
 
'furtively
 
adv
 
'furtiveness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

furtive
late 15c., from Fr. furtif, from L. furtivus "stolen, hidden, secret," from furtum "theft, robbery," from fur (gen. furis) "thief." Related: Furtiveness

furtively
late 15c.; from furtive + + -ly (2).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The eels hung back, waited till the coast was clear, and then furtively jabbed
  at their shrimp.
Aggrieved office workers puffed furtively out their windows.
Then the smugglers have to furtively transport the stuff and find a buyer with
  deep pockets.
The latter were furtively rolled into cigars and cigarettes and then
  re-exported.
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