gale

1 [geyl]
noun
1.
a very strong wind.
2.
Meteorology. a wind of 32–63 miles per hour (14–28 m/sec).
3.
a noisy outburst: a gale of laughter filled the room.
4.
Archaic. a gentle breeze.

Origin:
1540–50; perhaps < Scandinavian; compare Norwegian dialect geil uproar, unrest, boiling


3. burst, eruption, outbreak, fit, gust.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

gale

2 [geyl]
noun

Origin:
before 1000; Middle English gail, Old English gagel; cognate with German Gagel

Gale

[geyl]
noun
1.
Zona [zoh-nuh] , 1874–1938, U.S. novelist, short-story writer, playwright, and poet.
2.
a female or male given name.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To gale
Collins
World English Dictionary
gale1 (ɡeɪl)
 
n
1.  a strong wind, specifically one of force seven to ten on the Beaufort scale or from 45 to 90 kilometres per hour
2.  (often plural) a loud outburst, esp of laughter
3.  archaic, poetic a gentle breeze
 
[C16: of unknown origin]

gale2 (ɡeɪl)
 
n
short for sweet gale
 
[Old English gagel; related to Middle Low German gagel]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

gale
"storm at sea," 1540s, from gaile "wind," origin uncertain, perhaps from O.N. gol "breeze," or O.Dan. gal "bad, furious" (often used of weather), from O.N. galinn "bewitched." Or perhaps it is from O.E. galan "to sing" (the second element in nightingale), or giellan "to yell." In technical meteorological
use, a wind between 32 and 63 miles per hour.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

gale

wind that is stronger than a breeze; specifically a wind of 28-55 knots (50-102 km per hour) corresponding to force numbers 7 to 10 on the Beaufort scale. As issued by weather service forecasters, gale warnings occur when forecasted winds range from 34 to 47 knots (63 to 87 km per hour).

Learn more about gale with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
And a gale of criticism has forced the airline site's management to deny any
  allegations of monopolistic intent.
But the solar gale now heading our way isn't expected to be particularly
  harmful.
Taking even one step in a gale can be difficult, as things are more exaggerated.
Try shouting into a gale and see how that works for you.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature