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8 Words That Are Older Than You Think

glaring

[glair-ing] /ˈglɛər ɪŋ/
adjective
1.
shining with or reflecting a harshly bright or brilliant light.
2.
very conspicuous or obvious; flagrant:
several glaring errors in spelling.
3.
staring in a fiercely or angrily piercing manner.
4.
excessively showy or bright; garish.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English: see glare1, -ing2
Related forms
glaringly, adverb
glaringness, noun
nonglaring, adjective
unglaring, adjective
Synonyms
1. blinding. 2. prominent, patent. See flagrant. 4. loud, gaudy, flashy.

glare1

[glair] /glɛər/
noun
1.
a very harsh, bright, dazzling light:
in the glare of sunlight.
2.
a fiercely or angrily piercing stare.
3.
dazzling or showy appearance; showiness.
verb (used without object), glared, glaring.
4.
to shine with or reflect a very harsh, bright, dazzling light.
5.
to stare with a fiercely or angrily piercing look.
6.
Archaic. to appear conspicuous; stand out obtrusively.
verb (used with object), glared, glaring.
7.
to express with a glare:
They glared their anger at each other.
Origin
1250-1300; (v.) Middle English glaren; cognate with Middle Dutch, Middle Low German glaren; akin to glass (compare Old English glæren glassy); (noun) Middle English, derivative of the v.
Related forms
glareless, adjective
Synonyms
1. flare, glitter, flash. 4. See shine1 . 5. Glare, glower, gloat all have connotations of emotion that accompany an intense gaze. To glare is to look piercingly or angrily: A tiger glares at its prey. To glower is to look fiercely and threateningly, as from wrath; it suggests a scowl along with a glare: to glower at a mischievous child. To gloat meant originally to look with exultation, avaricious or malignant, on something or someone: a tyrant gloating over the helplessness of his victim. Today, however, it may simply imply inner exultation.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for glaring
  • Welfare reform has been an obvious success, despite some glaring inadequacies in the way the program was put together.
  • Include anachronisms, obvious misquotes, and glaring mistakes in logic.
  • But suits in gray silk satin, while nicely made, seemed a glaring commercial concession.
  • The glaring inconsistencies which his colleagues pointed out in his policies never dampened his spirits.
  • The glaring faults of his successor make his own mistakes in office look less bad by the day.
  • One glaring omission in the arguments of those advocating manned space exploration is in establishing the basic feasibility of it.
  • To start with, there were some rather glaring factual errors.
  • But for now they wait, shuffling foot-to-foot under the cargo hold's glaring lights.
  • Well, for example, a state could see a glaring statewide gap in college completion among majority and minority students.
  • The argument is ridiculous, and a glaring example of how a valid statistical relationship can be transformed into pure nonsense.
British Dictionary definitions for glaring

glaring

/ˈɡlɛərɪŋ/
adjective
1.
conspicuous: a glaring omission
2.
dazzling or garish
Derived Forms
glaringly, adverb
glaringness, noun

glare1

/ɡlɛə/
verb
1.
(intransitive) to stare angrily; glower
2.
(transitive) to express by glowering
3.
(intransitive) (of light, colour, etc) to be very bright and intense
4.
(intransitive) to be dazzlingly ornamented or garish
noun
5.
an angry stare
6.
a dazzling light or brilliance
7.
garish ornamentation or appearance; gaudiness
Derived Forms
glareless, adjective
glary, adjective
Word Origin
C13: probably from Middle Low German, Middle Dutch glaren to gleam; probably related to Old English glæren glassy; see glass

glare2

/ɡlɛə/
adjective
1.
(mainly US & Canadian) smooth and glassy: glare ice
Word Origin
C16: special use of glare1
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for glaring
adj.

late 14c., from present participle of glare. Meaning "obtrusively conspicuous" is from 1706.

glare

v.

late 13c., "shine brightly," from or related to Middle Dutch, Middle Low German glaren "to gleam," related by rhoticization to glas (see glass). Sense of "stare fiercely" is from late 14c. The noun is c.1400 in sense "bright light;" 1660s in sense of "fierce look." Old English glær (n.) meant "amber." Related: Glared; glaring.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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