glutathione

[gloo-tuh-thahy-ohn]
noun Biochemistry.
a crystalline, water-soluble peptide of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine, C 10 H 17 N 3 O 6 S, found in blood and in animal and plant tissues, and important in tissue oxidations and in the activation of some enzymes.

Origin:
1920–25; gluta(mic acid) + thi- + -one

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World English Dictionary
glutathione (ˌɡluːtəˈθaɪəʊn, -θaɪˈəʊn)
 
n
biochem a tripeptide consisting of glutamic acid, cysteine, and glycine: important in biological oxidations and the activation of some enzymes. Formula: C10H17N3O6S
 
[C20: from gluta(mic acid) + thi- + -one]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

glutathione glu·ta·thi·one (glōō'tə-thī'ōn')
n.
A tripeptide of the amino acids glycine, cystine, and glutamic acid occurring widely in plant and animal tissues and forming reduced and oxidized forms important in biological oxidation-reduction reactions.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
glutathione   (gl'tə-thī'ōn')  Pronunciation Key 
A polypeptide consisting of glycine, cysteine, and glutamic acid that occurs widely in plant and animal tissues. It is important in cellular respiration in both plants and animals, and serves as a cofactor for many enzymes. It is a major protective mechanism against oxidative stress. For example, it protects red blood cells from hydrogen peroxide, a toxic byproduct of certain metabolic reactions.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

glutathione

a tripeptide (i.e., compound composed of three amino acids), the chemical name of which is gamma-l-glutamyl-l-cysteinylglycine. Widely distributed in nature, it has been isolated from yeast, muscle, and liver. Glutathione has a role in the respiration of both mammalian and plant tissues and protects red blood cells against hydrogen peroxide, which is a toxic by-product of many metabolic reactions, by reducing the peroxide to water. It serves as a cofactor for various enzymes; e.g., glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, to which it becomes firmly bound.

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Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Glutathione occurs in high levels in the eye and helps clean up these free radicals.
Without glutathione, the body's ability to detoxify itself is greatly impaired, leading to oxidative stress.
Glutathione is critically important to both bowel and lung function.
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