glutton

1 [gluht-n]
noun
1.
a person who eats and drinks excessively or voraciously.
2.
a person with a remarkably great desire or capacity for something: a glutton for work; a glutton for punishment.

Origin:
1175–1225; Middle English glutun < Old French glouton < Latin gluttōn- (stem of gluttō), variant of glūtō glutton, akin to glūtīre to gulp down


1. gourmand; gastronome; chowhound.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

glutton

2 [gluht-n]
noun
the wolverine, Gulo gulo, of Europe.

Origin:
1665–75; translation of German Vielfrass, equivalent to viel much + frass eating, derivative of fressen (of animals) to eat

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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
glutton1 (ˈɡlʌtən)
 
n
1.  a person devoted to eating and drinking to excess; greedy person
2.  ironic often a person who has or appears to have a voracious appetite for something: a glutton for punishment
 
[C13: from Old French glouton, from Latin glutto, from gluttīre to swallow]
 
'gluttonous1
 
adj
 
'gluttonously1
 
adv

glutton2 (ˈɡlʌtən)
 
n
another name for wolverine
 
[C17: from glutton1, apparently translating German Vielfrass great eater]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

glutton
early 13c., from O.Fr. gluton, from L. gluttonem, acc. of glutto "overeater," formed from gluttire "to swallow," from gula "throat," from PIE *gel-.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Glutton definition


(Deut. 21:20), Heb. zolel, from a word meaning "to shake out," "to squander;" and hence one who is prodigal, who wastes his means by indulgence. In Prov. 23:21, the word means debauchees or wasters of their own body. In Prov. 28:7, the word (pl.) is rendered Authorized Version "riotous men;" Revised Version, "gluttonous." Matt. 11:19, Luke 7:34, Greek phagos, given to eating, gluttonous.

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
His sales are big and he's a glutton for work.
Which means, unless you're an unrepentant glutton, viewing choices must be made.
Perhaps I'm forgetful or a glutton for punishment.
It's just embarrassing to think like a glutton.
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