glycerol

[glis-uh-rawl, -rol] .
noun
a colorless, odorless, syrupy, sweet liquid, C 3 H 8 O 3 , usually obtained by the saponification of natural fats and oils: used for sweetening and preserving food, in the manufacture of cosmetics, perfumes, inks, and certain glues and cements, as a solvent and automobile antifreeze, and in medicine in suppositories and skin emollients.
Also called glycerin, glycerine.


Origin:
1880–85; glycer(in) + -ol1

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World English Dictionary
glycerol (ˈɡlɪsəˌrɒl)
 
n
glycerine, Also called (not in technical usage): glycerin a colourless or pale yellow odourless sweet-tasting syrupy liquid; 1,2,3-propanetriol: a by-product of soap manufacture, used as a solvent, antifreeze, plasticizer, and sweetener (E422). Formula: C3H8O3
 
[C19: from glycer(ine) + -ol1]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

glycerol glyc·er·ol (glĭs'ə-rôl', -rōl')
n.
A sweet syrupy fluid obtained by the saponification of fats and fixed oils, used as a solvent, a skin emollient, and as a vehicle and sweetening agent; it is also used by injection or in suppository form for constipation and orally to reduce ocular tension.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
glycerol   (glĭs'ə-rôl')  Pronunciation Key 
A sweet, syrupy liquid obtained from animal fats and oils or by the fermentation of glucose. It is used as a solvent, sweetener, and antifreeze and in making explosives and soaps. Glycerol consists of a propane molecule attached to three hydroxyl (OH) groups. Also called glycerin, glycerine. Chemical formula: C3H8O3.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
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Example sentences
The bottle actually contained glycerol, not fructose.
Its fuel is a mixture of glycerol and sodium borohydride.
Glycerol drives out the water molecules that normally scatter light and render skin opaque.
Glycerol maintains the protein solution at very low temperature, without freezing.
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