goodwill

[good-wil]
noun
1.
friendly disposition; benevolence; kindness.
2.
cheerful acquiescence or consent.
3.
Commerce. an intangible, salable asset arising from the reputation of a business and its relations with its customers, distinct from the value of its stock and other tangible assets.
Also, good will.


Origin:
before 900; Middle English; Old English gōd willa. See good, will2


1. friendliness. See favor.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
goodwill (ˌɡʊdˈwɪl)
 
n
1.  a feeling of benevolence, approval, and kindly interest
2.  (modifier) resulting from, showing, or designed to show goodwill: the government sent a goodwill mission to Moscow; a goodwill ambassador for UNICEF
3.  willingness or acquiescence
4.  accounting an intangible asset taken into account in assessing the value of an enterprise and reflecting its commercial reputation, customer connections, etc

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Example sentences
Goodwill is not alone in benefiting from the popularity of vintage clothing.
But agents threaten to drive a stake in the goodwill that educational
  opportunities afford.
Conservation depends on the goodwill of the local population.
The global goodwill resulting from such a high-profile vow would be enormous.
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