follow Dictionary.com

Why is the ninth month called September?

growing

[groh-ing] /ˈgroʊ ɪŋ/
adjective
1.
becoming greater in quantity, size, extent, or intensity:
growing discontent among industrial workers.
2.
having or showing life.
Origin
900
before 900; Middle English; Old English growende. See grow, -ing2
Related forms
growingly, adverb
ungrowing, adjective

grow

[groh] /groʊ/
verb (used without object), grew, grown, growing.
1.
to increase by natural development, as any living organism or part by assimilation of nutriment; increase in size or substance.
2.
to form and increase in size by a process of inorganic accretion, as by crystallization.
3.
to arise or issue as a natural development from an original happening, circumstance, or source:
Our friendship grew from common interests.
4.
to increase gradually in size, amount, etc.; become greater or larger; expand:
His influence has grown.
5.
to become gradually attached or united by or as if by growth:
The branches of the trees grew together, forming a natural arch.
6.
to come to be by degrees; become:
to grow old.
7.
Nautical. to lie or extend in a certain direction, as an anchor cable.
verb (used with object), grew, grown, growing.
8.
to cause to grow:
They grow corn.
9.
to allow to grow:
to grow a beard.
10.
to cover with a growth (used in the passive):
a field grown with corn.
Verb phrases
11.
grow into,
  1. to become large enough for:
    He'll grow into his brother's suits before long.
  2. to become mature or experienced enough for:
    She grew into the job, although she wasn't qualified for it at first.
12.
grow on/upon,
  1. to increase in influence or effect:
    An uneasy feeling grew upon him as he went through the old house.
  2. to become gradually more liked or accepted by:
    a village by the sea that grows on one.
13.
grow out of,
  1. to become too large or mature for; outgrow:
    He has grown out of all his clothes.
  2. to originate in; develop from:
    The plan grew out of a casual conversation.
14.
grow up,
  1. to be or become fully grown; attain mental or physical maturity.
  2. to come into existence; arise:
    New cities grew up in the desert.
Origin
before 900; Middle English growen, Old English grōwan; cognate with Dutch groeien, Old High German grouwan, Old Norse grōa
Related forms
growable, adjective
regrow, verb, regrew, regrown, regrowing.
Synonyms
1. develop, multiply, swell, enlarge, expand, extend. 3. originate. 4. wax. 8. raise, cultivate, produce.
Antonyms
1. decrease. 4. wane.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source
Examples for growing
  • No matter which type you choose, feed plants regularly during the growing season, and they'll reward you with lush growth.
  • No matter where you live, it's a great time to start growing some summer herbs.
  • There is a growing consensus that the situation is dire-and looking bleaker every day.
  • Much of the mystery was of her own making, growing out of her reticent, elusive personality.
  • Were he alive today in the growing digital age, he would still be struggling with the difference.
  • Another growing field of biology is shedding further light on the origins of variation.
  • Though they occasionally spar with crocodiles, a growing number of skirmishes are with humans.
  • Other estimates put the number even higher, and it is projected to continue growing.
  • The end of the era of cheap food has coincided with growing concern about the prospects of feeding the world.
  • Foreign firms are increasingly lured by these countries' fast-growing domestic markets as much as lower wages.
British Dictionary definitions for growing

grow

/ɡrəʊ/
verb grows, growing, grew (ɡruː), grown (ɡrəʊn)
1.
(of an organism or part of an organism) to increase in size or develop (hair, leaves, or other structures)
2.
(intransitive; usually foll by out of or from) to originate, as from an initial cause or source the federation grew out of the Empire
3.
(intransitive) to increase in size, number, degree, etc the population is growing rapidly
4.
(intransitive) to change in length or amount in a specified direction some plants grow downwards, profits over the years grew downwards
5.
(copula; may take an infinitive) (esp of emotions, physical states, etc) to develop or come into existence or being gradually to grow cold, to grow morose, he grew to like her
6.
(intransitive) usually foll by up. to come into existence a close friendship grew up between them
7.
(intransitive) foll by together. to be joined gradually by or as by growth the branches on the tree grew together
8.
(intransitive; foll by away, together, etc) to develop a specified state of friendship the lovers grew together gradually, many friends grow apart over the years
9.
when intr, foll by with. to become covered with a growth the path grew with weeds
10.
to produce (plants) by controlling or encouraging their growth, esp for home consumption or on a commercial basis
Word Origin
Old English grōwan; related to Old Norse grōa, Old Frisian grōia, Old High German gruoen; see green, grass
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for growing
adj.

Old English, present participle adjective from grow (v.). Growing season is attested from 1729; growing pains by 1752.

n.

late 14c., verbal noun from grow (v.).

grow

v.

Old English growan (of plants) "to grow, flourish, increase, develop, get bigger" (class VII strong verb; past tense greow, past participle growen), from Proto-Germanic *gro- (cf. Old Norse groa, Old Frisian groia, Dutch groeien, Old High German gruoen), from PIE root *ghre- (see grass). Applied in Middle English to human beings (c.1300) and animals (early 15c.) and their parts, supplanting Old English weaxan (see wax (v.)).

Have you ever heard anything about God, Topsy? ... Do you know who made you?" "Nobody, as I knows on," said the child. ... "I spect I grow'd. Don't think nobody never made me." [Harriet B. Stowe, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," 1851]

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
growing in Medicine

grow (grō)
v. grew (grōō), grown (grōn), grow·ing, grows

  1. To increase in size by a natural process.

  2. To develop and reach maturity.

  3. To be capable of growth; thrive.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with growing
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for growing

Most English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for growing

12
15
Scrabble Words With Friends

Quotes with growing