hazing

[hey-zing]
noun
subjection to harassment or ridicule.

Origin:
1815–25; haze2 + -ing1

Dictionary.com Unabridged

haze

1 [heyz]
noun
1.
an aggregation in the atmosphere of very fine, widely dispersed, solid or liquid particles, or both, giving the air an opalescent appearance that subdues colors.
2.
vagueness or obscurity, as of the mind or perception; confused or vague thoughts, feelings, etc.: The victims were still in a haze and couldn't describe the accident.
verb (used with object), verb (used without object), hazed, hazing.
3.
to make or become hazy.

Origin:
1700–10; perhaps noun use of Middle English *hase; Old English hasu, variant of haswa ashen, dusky. See hazy, hare

hazeless, adjective


2. See cloud.

haze

2 [heyz]
verb (used with object), hazed, hazing.
1.
to subject (freshmen, newcomers, etc.) to abusive or humiliating tricks and ridicule.
2.
Chiefly Nautical. to harass with unnecessary or disagreeable tasks.

Origin:
1670–80; < Middle French haser to irritate, annoy

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
haze1 (heɪz)
 
n
1.  meteorol
 a.  reduced visibility in the air as a result of condensed water vapour, dust, etc, in the atmosphere
 b.  the moisture or dust causing this
2.  obscurity of perception, feeling, etc
 
vb (when intr, often foll by over)
3.  to make or become hazy
 
[C18: back formation from hazy]

haze2 (heɪz)
 
vb
1.  chiefly (US), (Canadian) to subject (fellow students) to ridicule or abuse
2.  nautical to harass with humiliating tasks
 
[C17: of uncertain origin]
 
'hazer2
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

haze
see hazy.

haze
"subject to cruel horseplay," 1850, Amer.Eng. student slang, from earlier nautical sense of "punish by keeping at unpleasant and unnecessary hard work" (1840), perhaps from hawze "terrify, frighten, confound" (1670s), from M.Fr. haser "irritate, annoy" (mid-15c.), of unknown origin.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
King, left, were hospitalized this week with infected leg wounds that may have
  resulted from fraternity hazing.
Groups found guilty of hazing can lose university recognition, funds, and use
  of campus facilities.
It reminded me of a fraternity hazing with the older monks giving the younger
  ones grief.
She may have decided that the hazing of a presidential campaign is simply not
  worth the uncertain reward.
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