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homebound1

[hohm-bound] /ˈhoʊmˈbaʊnd/
adjective
1.
going home:
homebound commuters.
Origin
1880-1885
1880-85; home + bound4

homebound2

[hohm-bound] /ˈhoʊmˌbaʊnd/
adjective
1.
confined to one's home, especially because of illness.
Origin
1880-85; home + bound1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for homebound
  • The homebound folks also had an increased risk of other cognitive impairments and a faster rate of cognitive decline.
  • While teleconferencing is hardly new, it has found a new role: easing the isolation of homebound people.
  • First, workers caring for the homebound elderly went on strike.
  • homebound elderly and disabled people who could vote by absentee ballot in primaries can't participate in caucuses.
  • People who suffer from this disease are in constant pain and they are often disabled and homebound.
  • To be homebound means that leaving home takes considerable and taxing effort.
  • Deliver to and pick up books from homebound patrons.
  • homebound students who remain enrolled in the district are the district's responsibility for testing.
  • Home visits by appointment for homebound and disabled residents.
  • Performs a variety full performance skilled duties related to the day to day preparation of congregate and homebound meals.
Word Origin and History for homebound
adj.

1882, from home (n.) + bound (adj.2).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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homebound in Medicine

homebound home·bound2 (hōm'bound')
adj.
Restricted or confined to home, as of an invalid.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Word Value for homebound

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