honeyed

[huhn-eed]
adjective
1.
containing, consisting of, or resembling honey: honeyed drinks.
2.
flattering or ingratiating: honeyed words.
3.
pleasantly soft; dulcet or mellifluous: honeyed tones.
Also, honied.


Origin:
1325–75; Middle English honyede. See honey, -ed3

honeyedly, adverb
honeyedness, noun
unhoneyed, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

honey

[huhn-ee]
noun, plural honeys.
1.
a sweet, viscid fluid produced by bees from the nectar collected from flowers, and stored in nests or hives as food.
2.
this substance as used in cooking or as a spread or sweetener.
3.
the nectar of flowers.
4.
any of various similarly sweet, viscid products produced by insects or in other ways.
5.
something sweet, delicious, or delightful: the honey of flattery.
6.
Informal. a person for whom one feels love or deep affection; sweetheart; darling.
7.
(sometimes initial capital letter) an affectionate or familiar term of address, as to a child or romantic partner (sometimes offensive when used to strangers, casual acquaintances, subordinates, etc., especially by a male to a female).
8.
Informal. something of especially high quality, degree of excellence, etc.: That's a honey of a computer.
adjective
9.
of, like, or pertaining to honey; sweet.
10.
containing honey or flavored or sweetened with honey.
verb (used with object), honeyed or honied, honeying.
11.
Informal. to talk flatteringly or endearingly to (often followed by up ).
12.
to sweeten or flavor with or as if with honey.
verb (used without object), honeyed or honied, honeying.
13.
Informal. to use flattery, endearing terms, etc., in an effort to obtain something (often followed by up ): They always got what they wanted by honeying up to their grandfather.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English hony, Old English hunig; cognate with Dutch, German honig, Old Norse hunang; akin to Greek knēkós pale yellow, tawny

honeyful, adjective
honeyless, adjective
honeylike, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
honey (ˈhʌnɪ)
 
n
1.  a sweet viscid substance made by bees from nectar and stored in their nests or hives as food. It is spread on bread or used as a sweetening agent
2.  any similar sweet substance, esp the nectar of flowers
3.  anything that is sweet or delightful
4.  chiefly (US), (Canadian) (often capital) a term of endearment
5.  informal chiefly (US), (Canadian) something considered to be very good of its kind: a honey of a car
6.  (modifier) of, concerned with, or resembling honey
 
vb , honeys, honeying, honeyed, honied
7.  (tr) to sweeten with or as if with honey
8.  (often foll by up) to talk to (someone) in a fond or flattering way
 
[Old English huneg; related to Old Norse hunang, Old Saxon hanig, German Honig, Greek knēkos yellowish, Sanskrit kánaka- gold]
 
'honey-like
 
adj

honeyed or honied (ˈhʌnɪd)
 
adj
1.  flattering or soothing
2.  made sweet or agreeable: honeyed words
3.  of, full of, or resembling honey
 
honied or honied
 
adj
 
'honeyedly or honied
 
adv
 
'honiedly or honied
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

honey
O.E. hunig, from W.Gmc. *khunaga- (cf. O.N. hunang, Swed. honung, Ger. Honig "honey"); perhaps cognate with Skt. kancanum, Welsh canecon "gold." The more common IE word is represented by Goth. miliþ (from PIE *melith "honey"). A term of endearment from at least 1350. Honeycomb is O.E. hunigcamb
(see comb), perhaps reflecting an unsavory image from combing one's hair in a time and place when washing it was rare. Honey-bee is from c.1566.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Easton
Bible Dictionary

Honey definition


(1.) Heb. ya'ar, occurs only 1 Sam. 14:25, 27, 29; Cant. 5:1, where it denotes the honey of bees. Properly the word signifies a forest or copse, and refers to honey found in woods. (2.) Nopheth, honey that drops (Ps. 19:10; Prov. 5:3; Cant. 4:11). (3.) Debash denotes bee-honey (Judg. 14:8); but also frequently a vegetable honey distilled from trees (Gen. 43:11; Ezek. 27:17). In these passages it may probably mean "dibs," or syrup of grapes, i.e., the juice of ripe grapes boiled down to one-third of its bulk. (4.) Tsuph, the cells of the honey-comb full of honey (Prov. 16:24; Ps. 19:10). (5.) "Wild honey" (Matt. 3:4) may have been the vegetable honey distilled from trees, but rather was honey stored by bees in rocks or in trees (Deut. 32:13; Ps. 81:16; 1 Sam. 14:25-29). Canaan was a "land flowing with milk and honey" (Ex. 3:8). Milk and honey were among the chief dainties in the earlier ages, as they are now among the Bedawin; and butter and honey are also mentioned among articles of food (Isa. 7:15). The ancients used honey instead of sugar (Ps. 119:103; Prov. 24:13); but when taken in great quantities it caused nausea, a fact referred to in Prov. 25:16, 17 to inculcate moderation in pleasures. Honey and milk also are put for sweet discourse (Cant. 4:11).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
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Example sentences
Try the honeyed mascarpone tofu on baguette or the liver mousse with figs.
And in one of the film's many wonderful vignettes, she enjoys her first sip of
  honeyed tea.
When ripe and ready to eat, the pear has a honeyed flavor and beckoning perfume
  that bewitch your senses.
Handsome when sliced, with a rich blend of sugars and acids, its yellow flesh
  has an intense honeyed flavor.
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