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hyperspace

[hahy-per-speys] /ˈhaɪ pərˌspeɪs/
noun, Mathematics
1.
a Euclidean space of dimension greater than three.
Origin
1865-1870
1865-70; hyper- + space
Related forms
hyperspatial
[hahy-per-spey-shuh l] /ˌhaɪ pərˈspeɪ ʃəl/ (Show IPA),
adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for hyperspace
  • hyperspace travel using hidden dimensions that have yet to be sensed would fall into this category.
  • In hyperspace co-dimensions the speed of light has a different value depending on the physics constants of the dimension.
  • If such center exists, it is in the higher dimension hyperspace.
  • With each foray into hyperspace something new is added to the craft, the orbits widen, the technical manuals expand.
  • It's possible there isn't the warp drive or hyperspace engine sitting out there waiting for us to invent it.
  • Describes a universe of ten dimensions using a superstring theory of hyperspace that synthesizes relativity and quantum theories.
British Dictionary definitions for hyperspace

hyperspace

/ˌhaɪpəˈspeɪs/
noun
1.
(maths) space having more than three dimensions: often used to describe a multi-dimensional environment
2.
(in science fiction) a theoretical dimension within which conventional space-time relationship does not apply
Derived Forms
hyperspatial (ˌhaɪpəˈspeɪʃəl) adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for hyperspace
n.

"space of more than three dimensions," 1867, from hyper- + space (n.). A hybrid; correctly formed it would be superspace.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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hyperspace in Technology


/hi:'per-spays/ A memory location that is *far* away from where the program counter should be pointing, often inaccessible because it is not even mapped in. (Compare jump off into never-never land.)
This usage is from the SF notion of a spaceship jumping "into hyperspace", that is, taking a shortcut through higher-dimensional space - in other words, bypassing this universe. The variant "east hyperspace" is recorded among CMU and Bliss hackers.
[Jargon File]
(1994-11-23)

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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