hyper

1 [hahy-per] Informal.
adjective
1.
overexcited; overstimulated; keyed up.
2.
seriously or obsessively concerned; fanatical; rabid: She's hyper about noise pollution.
noun
4.
a person who is hyper.

Origin:
1970–75; probably independent use of hyper-

Dictionary.com Unabridged

hyper

2 [hahy-per]
noun Informal.
a person who promotes or publicizes events, people, etc., especially one who uses flamboyant or questionable methods; promoter; publicist.

Origin:
1910–15, Americanism, for an earlier sense; hype1 + -er1

hyper-

a prefix appearing in loanwords from Greek, where it meant “over,” usually implying excess or exaggeration (hyperbole ); on this model used, especially as opposed to hypo-, in the formation of compound words (hyperthyroid ).
Compare super-.


Origin:
Greek, representing hypér over, above; cognate with Latin super (see super-); akin to over

hyper-, hypo-.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
hype2 (haɪp)
 
n
1.  a deception or racket
2.  intensive or exaggerated publicity or sales promotion: media hype
3.  the person or thing so publicized
 
vb
4.  to market or promote (a product) using exaggerated or intensive publicity
5.  to falsify or rig (something)
6.  (in the pop-music business) to buy (copies of a particular record) in such quantity as to increase its ratings in the charts
 
[C20: of unknown origin]
 
'hyper2
 
n
 
'hyping2
 
n

hyper (ˈhaɪpə)
 
adj
informal overactive; overexcited
 
[C20: probably independent use of hyper-]

hyper-
 
prefix
1.  above, over, or in excess: hypercritical
2.  (in medicine) denoting an abnormal excess: hyperacidity
3.  indicating that a chemical compound contains a greater than usual amount of an element: hyperoxide
 
[from Greek huper over]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

hyper-
from Gk. hyper (prep. and adv.) "over, beyond, overmuch, above measure." As a word by itself, meaning "overexcited," it is attested from 1942, short for hyperactive.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

hyper- pref.

  1. Over; above; beyond: hyperflexion.

  2. Excessive; excessively: hyperhydration.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
hyper-  
A prefix that means "excessive" or "excessively," especially in medical terms like hypertension and hyperthyroidism.
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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Slang Dictionary

hyper definition

[ˈhɑɪpɚ]
  1. mod.
    excited; overreacting. : I'm a little hyper because of the doctor's report.
  2. n.
    a person who praises or promotes someone or something. : She's a hyper, and she doesn't always tell things the way they are.
  3. n.
    a person who is always overly excited or hyperactive. : Pat is such a hyper. Just can't seem to relax.
Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions by Richard A. Spears.Fourth Edition.
Copyright 2007. Published by McGraw-Hill Education.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
For starters, the people he links to for support warn about inflation that is
  distinctly not hyper in nature.
She was hyper for several hours uncovering bone after bone until the entire
  flipper was uncovered.
Slow boring stuff for when they are tired to exciting guitars and kick it beats
  when they are hyper.
Hyper inflation tends to be a function of out of control public expenditures.
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