immutable

[ih-myoo-tuh-buhl]
adjective
not mutable; unchangeable; changeless.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin immūtābilis. See im-2, mutable

immutability, immutableness, noun
immutably, adverb
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World English Dictionary
immutable (ɪˈmjuːtəbəl)
 
adj
unchanging through time; unalterable; ageless: immutable laws
 
immuta'bility
 
n
 
im'mutableness
 
n
 
im'mutably
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

immutable
1412, from O.Fr. immutable, from L. immutabilis "unchangeable," from in- "not" + mutabilis "changeable," from mutare "to change" (see mutable).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Apart from synchronization, immutability can provide thread safety.
Accidental incidents can have endless effects, and behind everything is the immutability of the human heart.
It had something to do with the immutability of fate.
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