impartial

[im-pahr-shuhl]
adjective
not partial or biased; fair; just: an impartial judge.

Origin:
1585–95; im-2 + partial

impartiality [im-pahr-shee-al-i-tee] , impartialness, noun
impartially, adverb
pseudoimpartial, adjective
pseudoimpartially, adverb
quasi-impartial, adjective
quasi-impartially, adverb
unimpartial, adjective
unimpartially, adverb


unbiased, unprejudiced, equitable. See fair1.


biased.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
impartial (ɪmˈpɑːʃəl)
 
adj
not prejudiced towards or against any particular side or party; fair; unbiased
 
imparti'ality
 
n
 
im'partialness
 
n
 
im'partially
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

impartial
formed in Eng. 1593 from in- "not" + partial (q.v.). First recorded in "Richard II."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
We should impartially reverberate whatever info comes our way.
The cause of losses, whatever it was, killed novice and expert crews
  impartially.
Science journalism does not consist in reporting the consensus, it consists in
  impartially reporting on the evidence.
It is difficult to write impartially about any revolutionary leader.
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