implement

[n. im-pluh-muhnt; v. im-pluh-ment, -muhnt]
noun
1.
any article used in some activity, especially an instrument, tool, or utensil: agricultural implements.
2.
an article of equipment, as household furniture, clothing, ecclesiastical vestments, or the like.
3.
a means; agent: human beings as an implement of divine plan.
verb (used with object)
4.
to fulfill; perform; carry out: Once in office, he failed to implement his campaign promises.
5.
to put into effect according to or by means of a definite plan or procedure.
6.
to fill out or supplement.
7.
to provide with implements.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin implēmentum a filling up, equivalent to Latin implē(re) to fill up (im- im-1 + plēre to fill) + -mentum -ment

implementable, adjective
implemental, adjective
implementation, noun
implementer, implementor, noun
nonimplement, noun
nonimplemental, adjective
reimplement, verb (used with object)


1. See tool.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
implement
 
n
1.  a piece of equipment; tool or utensil: gardening implements
2.  something used to achieve a purpose; agent
 
vb
3.  to carry out; put into action; perform: to implement a plan
4.  archaic to complete, satisfy, or fulfil
 
[C17: from Late Latin implēmentum, literally: a filling up, from Latin implēre to fill up, satisfy, fulfil]
 
imple'mental
 
adj
 
implemen'tation
 
n
 
'implementer
 
n
 
'implementor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

implement
1454, from L.L. implementem "a filling up" (as with provisions), from L. implere "to fill," from in- "in" + plere "to fill" (see plenary). Sense of "tool" is 1538, from notion of things provided to do work, that which "fills up" a house, etc. The verb is 1806, originally
chiefly in Scot., where it was a legal term meaning "fulfillment." It led to the wretched formation implementation, first recorded 1926.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The company considered the experiment so successful that they implemented a
  wider telecommuting policy.
However, many details of the agreement remain to be resolved and implemented.
Try and imagine the catastrophic damage if implemented.
What follows is a framework for disparate ideas and policies that have been
  bruited about and in some cases partly implemented.
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