implement

[n. im-pluh-muhnt; v. im-pluh-ment, -muhnt]
noun
1.
any article used in some activity, especially an instrument, tool, or utensil: agricultural implements.
2.
an article of equipment, as household furniture, clothing, ecclesiastical vestments, or the like.
3.
a means; agent: human beings as an implement of divine plan.
verb (used with object)
4.
to fulfill; perform; carry out: Once in office, he failed to implement his campaign promises.
5.
to put into effect according to or by means of a definite plan or procedure.
6.
to fill out or supplement.
7.
to provide with implements.

Origin:
1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin implēmentum a filling up, equivalent to Latin implē(re) to fill up (im- im-1 + plēre to fill) + -mentum -ment

implementable, adjective
implemental, adjective
implementation, noun
implementer, implementor, noun
nonimplement, noun
nonimplemental, adjective
reimplement, verb (used with object)


1. See tool.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
implement
 
n
1.  a piece of equipment; tool or utensil: gardening implements
2.  something used to achieve a purpose; agent
 
vb
3.  to carry out; put into action; perform: to implement a plan
4.  archaic to complete, satisfy, or fulfil
 
[C17: from Late Latin implēmentum, literally: a filling up, from Latin implēre to fill up, satisfy, fulfil]
 
imple'mental
 
adj
 
implemen'tation
 
n
 
'implementer
 
n
 
'implementor
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

implement
1454, from L.L. implementem "a filling up" (as with provisions), from L. implere "to fill," from in- "in" + plere "to fill" (see plenary). Sense of "tool" is 1538, from notion of things provided to do work, that which "fills up" a house, etc. The verb is 1806, originally
chiefly in Scot., where it was a legal term meaning "fulfillment." It led to the wretched formation implementation, first recorded 1926.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Must have experience in developing and implementing strategies for closing
  gifts five and six figured gifts.
To the regimes implementing them, the political results matter most.
Implementing new workplace policies can significantly reduce your office's
  paper use.
Implementing these kinds of cuts would generate a lot of pressure.
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