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incorrigible

[in-kawr-i-juh-buh l, -kor-] /ɪnˈkɔr ɪ dʒə bəl, -ˈkɒr-/
adjective
1.
not corrigible; bad beyond correction or reform:
incorrigible behavior; an incorrigible liar.
2.
impervious to constraints or punishment; willful; unruly; uncontrollable:
an incorrigible child; incorrigible hair.
3.
firmly fixed; not easily changed:
an incorrigible habit.
4.
not easily swayed or influenced:
an incorrigible optimist.
noun
5.
a person who is incorrigible.
Origin of incorrigible
1300-1350
1300-50; Middle English < Latin incorrigibilis. See in-3, corrigible
Related forms
incorrigibility, incorrigibleness, noun
incorrigibly, adverb
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for incorrigible
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • What shall be done with confirmed and incorrigible offenders?

    The Arena Various
  • "You are an incorrigible, young Bonaparte," said the teacher.

  • I close with a plea for forbearance towards my incorrigible writing and my lame, headlong style.

  • Razumov envied the materialism of the thief and the passion of the incorrigible lover.

    Under Western Eyes Joseph Conrad
  • This naturally tries the temper of high-spirited mistresses—as does also the incorrigible carelessness of some servants.

    Six Months at the Cape R.M. Ballantyne
British Dictionary definitions for incorrigible

incorrigible

/ɪnˈkɒrɪdʒəbəl/
adjective
1.
beyond correction, reform, or alteration
2.
firmly rooted; ineradicable
3.
(philosophy) (of a belief) having the property that whoever honestly believes it cannot be mistaken Compare defeasible
noun
4.
a person or animal that is incorrigible
Derived Forms
incorrigibility, incorrigibleness, noun
incorrigibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Word Origin and History for incorrigible
adj.

mid-14c., from Old French incorrigible (mid-14c.), or directly from Latin incorrigibilis "not to be corrected," from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + corrigibilis, from corrigere "to correct" (see correct). Related: Incorrigibly. As a noun, from 1746.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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