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[in-krej-uh-luh s] /ɪnˈkrɛdʒ ə ləs/
not credulous; disinclined or indisposed to believe; skeptical.
indicating or showing unbelief:
an incredulous smile.
Origin of incredulous
1525-35; < Latin incrēdulus. See in-3, credulous
Related forms
incredulously, adverb
incredulousness, noun
Can be confused
incredible, incredulous.
unbelieving. See doubtful. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for incredulous
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • I was incredulous at first, for I still thought of distances in the old way.

    High Adventure James Norman Hall
  • Godfrey gazed at her; he listened with parted lips, incredulous and appalled.

    The Marriages Henry James
  • Not,' with an accent of incredulous indignation, 'Prue again?'

    Doctor Cupid Rhoda Broughton
  • And the other peers into his face with incredulous curiosity.

    Floyd Grandon's Honor Amanda Minnie Douglas
  • I gazed at him in bewilderment; ready to laugh if he meant to be jocular, incredulous of his serious intention.

    The Abandoned Farmer Sydney Herman Preston
British Dictionary definitions for incredulous


(often foll by of) not prepared or willing to believe (something); unbelieving
Derived Forms
incredulously, adverb
incredulousness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for incredulous

"unbelieving," 1570s, from Latin incredulus "unbelieving, incredulous," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + credulus (see credulous). Formerly also of religious beliefs. Related: Incredulously; incredulousness.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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