indirect

[in-duh-rekt, -dahy-]
adjective
1.
not in a direct course or path; deviating from a straight line; roundabout: an indirect course in sailing.
2.
coming or resulting otherwise than directly or immediately, as effects or consequences: an indirect advantage.
3.
not direct in action or procedure: His methods are indirect but not dishonest.
4.
not straightforward; devious; deceitful: He is known as a shady, indirect fellow.
5.
not direct in bearing, application, force, etc.: indirect evidence.
6.
of, pertaining to, or characteristic of indirect discourse: an indirect quote.
7.
not descending in a direct line of succession, as a title or inheritance.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Medieval Latin indīrēctus. See in-3, direct

indirectly, adverb
indirectness, noun
semi-indirect, adjective
semi-indirectly, adverb
semi-indirectness, noun


2. incidental, unintentional, secondary.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
indirect (ˌɪndɪˈrɛkt)
 
adj
1.  deviating from a direct course or line; roundabout; circuitous
2.  not coming as a direct effect or consequence; secondary: indirect benefits
3.  not straightforward, open, or fair; devious or evasive: an indirect insult
4.  (of a title or an inheritance) not inherited in an unbroken line of succession from father to son
 
indi'rectly
 
adv
 
indi'rectness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

indirect
1474, from M.Fr. indirect (1364), from L. indirectus, from in- "not" + directus (see direct).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Start them over indirect heat, away from the hottest part of the grill.
Display in bright, indirect light, and water regularly.
These so-called indirect land use impacts have questionable scientific validity.
Resources, time, and the emphasis on direct measures and indirect measures
  rather than quality indicators.
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