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induce

[in-doos, -dyoos] /ɪnˈdus, -ˈdyus/
verb (used with object), induced, inducing.
1.
to lead or move by persuasion or influence, as to some action or state of mind:
to induce a person to buy a raffle ticket.
2.
to bring about, produce, or cause:
That medicine will induce sleep.
3.
Physics. to produce (an electric current) by induction.
4.
Logic. to assert or establish (a proposition about a class of phenomena) on the basis of observations on a number of particular facts.
5.
Genetics. to increase expression of (a gene) by inactivating a negative control system or activating a positive control system; derepress.
6.
Biochemistry. to stimulate the synthesis of (a protein, especially an enzyme) by increasing gene transcription.
Origin
1325-1375
1325-75; Middle English < Latin indūcere to lead or bring in, introduce, equivalent to in- in-2 + dūcere to lead; cf. adduce, deduce, reduce
Related forms
inducible, adjective
noninduced, adjective
noninducible, adjective
preinduce, verb (used with object), preinduced, preinducing.
quasi-induced, adjective
reinduce, verb (used with object), reinduced, reinducing.
uninduced, adjective
uninducible, adjective
Can be confused
adduce, deduce, induce.
Synonyms
1. actuate, prompt, incite, urge, spur. See persuade.
Antonyms
1. dissuade.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for induce
  • Foods that have been carefully crafted to induce pleasurable sensory experiences can also become victims of this truism.
  • Trying to understand nanometers can rapidly induce crossed eyes.
  • It's nearly as bad as the commercials for the gum that involve beating up the chewer to induce spitting out the gum.
  • Apart from the moral queasiness this ought to induce, there is a tangible consequence.
  • But leave one or two nose hairs in case you need something to pluck to induce a stuck sneeze.
  • Thankfully, no one was around the bridge to induce camera shake.
  • Scientists have determined that long artificial days-and artificially short nights-induce early breeding in a wide range of birds.
  • Lachrymators stimulate corneal nerves which induce tearing and even temporary blindness.
  • They induce wild creatures to interact with their canvases.
  • Blue wavelengths provide enough heat to induce the chemical reaction without harming the components.
British Dictionary definitions for induce

induce

/ɪnˈdjuːs/
verb (transitive)
1.
(often foll by an infinitive) to persuade or use influence on
2.
to cause or bring about
3.
(med) to initiate or hasten (labour), as by administering a drug to stimulate uterine contractions
4.
(logic, obsolete) to assert or establish (a general proposition, hypothesis, etc) by induction
5.
to produce (an electromotive force or electrical current) by induction
6.
to transmit (magnetism) by induction
Derived Forms
inducer, noun
inducible, adjective
Word Origin
C14: from Latin indūcere to lead in, from dūcere to lead
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for induce
v.

late 14c., "to lead by persuasions or other influences," from Latin inducere "lead into, bring in, introduce, conduct, persuade," from in- "into, in, on, upon" (see in- (2)) + ducere "to lead" (see duke (n.)). Meaning "to bring about," of concrete situations, etc., is from early 15c.; sense of "to infer by reasoning" is from 1560s. Electro-magnetic sense first recorded 1777. Related: Induced; inducing.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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induce in Medicine

induce in·duce (ĭn-dōōs', -dyōōs')
v. in·duced, in·duc·ing, in·duc·es

  1. To bring about or stimulate the occurrence of something, such as labor.

  2. To initiate or increase the production of an enzyme or other protein at the level of genetic transcription.

  3. To produce an electric current or a magnetic charge by induction.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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