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induction

[in-duhk-shuh n] /ɪnˈdʌk ʃən/
noun
1.
the act of inducing, bringing about, or causing:
induction of the hypnotic state.
2.
the act of inducting; introduction; initiation.
3.
formal installation in an office, benefice, or the like.
4.
Logic.
  1. any form of reasoning in which the conclusion, though supported by the premises, does not follow from them necessarily.
  2. the process of estimating the validity of observations of part of a class of facts as evidence for a proposition about the whole class.
  3. a conclusion reached by this process.
5.
Also called mathematical induction. Mathematics. a method of proving a given property true for a set of numbers by proving it true for 1 and then true for an arbitrary positive integer by assuming the property true for all previous positive integers and applying the principle of mathematical induction.
6.
a presentation or bringing forward, as of facts or evidence.
7.
Electricity, Magnetism. the process by which a body having electric or magnetic properties produces magnetism, an electric charge, or an electromotive force in a neighboring body without contact.
8.
Embryology. the process or principle by which one part of the embryo influences the differentiation of another part.
9.
Biochemistry. the synthesis of an enzyme in response to an increased concentration of its substrate in the cell.
10.
an introductory unit in literary work, especially in an early play; prelude or scene independent of the main performance but related to it.
11.
Archaic. a preface.
Origin
1350-1400
1350-1400; Middle English induccio(u)n < Latin inductiōn- (stem of inductiō). See induct, -ion
Related forms
inductionless, adjective
anti-induction, adjective
preinduction, noun
reinduction, noun
Can be confused
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for induction
  • All the martinis from my induction had my mind a bit fuzzy.
  • The ability to follow a beat is called beat induction.
  • Today electricity can be transmitted via magnetic induction in such things as security swipe cards.
  • Jacobs hits another switch and the rocket shoots ahead sharply, powered by a linear induction motor.
  • induction of human neuronal cells by defined transcription factors.
  • They built a huge linear-induction catapult, powered by solar panels and built with local materials.
  • So began its disastrous mid-decade induction into the dark arts of leverage, aggressive lending, and currency arbitrage.
  • Music with a rapid tempo, and written in a major key, correlated precisely with the induction of happiness.
  • The interaction is not based on field strength but on induction.
  • The problem is induction motors in refrigerators and air-conditioner.
British Dictionary definitions for induction

induction

/ɪnˈdʌkʃən/
noun
1.
the act of inducting or state of being inducted
2.
the act of inducing
3.
(in an internal-combustion engine) the part of the action of a piston by which mixed air and fuel are drawn from the carburettor to the cylinder
4.
(logic)
  1. a process of reasoning, used esp in science, by which a general conclusion is drawn from a set of premises, based mainly on experience or experimental evidence. The conclusion goes beyond the information contained in the premises, and does not follow necessarily from them. Thus an inductive argument may be highly probable, yet lead from true premises to a false conclusion
  2. a conclusion reached by this process of reasoning Compare deduction (sense 4)
5.
the process by which electrical or magnetic properties are transferred, without physical contact, from one circuit or body to another See also inductance
6.
(biology) the effect of one tissue, esp an embryonic tissue, on the development of an adjacent tissue
7.
(biochem) the process by which synthesis of an enzyme is stimulated by the presence of its substrate
8.
(maths, logic)
  1. a method of proving a proposition that all integers have a property, by first proving that 1 has the property and then that if the integer n has it so has n + 1
  2. the application of recursive rules
9.
  1. a formal introduction or entry into an office or position
  2. (as modifier): induction course, induction period
10.
(US) the formal enlistment of a civilian into military service
11.
an archaic word for preface
Derived Forms
inductional, adjective
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for induction
n.

late 14c., "advancement toward the grace of God;" also (c.1400) "formal installation of a clergyman," from Old French induction (14c.) or directly from Latin inductionem (nominative inductio) "a leading in, introduction," noun of action from past participle stem of inducere "to lead" (see induce).

As a term in logic (early 15c.) it is from Cicero's use of inductio to translate Greek epagoge "leading to" in Aristotle. Induction starts with known instances and arrives at generalizations; deduction starts from the general principle and arrives at some individual fact. As a term of science, c.1800; military service sense is from 1934, American English.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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induction in Medicine

induction in·duc·tion (ĭn-dŭk'shən)
n.

  1. The process of initiating or increasing the production of an enzyme or other protein at the level of genetic transcription.

  2. The period from the first administration of anesthesia to the establishment of a depth of anesthesia adequate for surgery.

  3. The change in form or shape caused by the action of one tissue of an embryo on adjacent tissues or parts, as by the diffusion of hormones.

  4. A modification imposed upon the offspring by the action of environment on the germ cells of one or both parents.

  5. The generation of electromotive force in a closed circuit by a varying magnetic flux through the circuit.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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induction in Science
induction
  (ĭn-dŭk'shən)   

    1. The process of deriving general principles from particular facts or instances.

    2. A conclusion reached by this process. See Note at deduction.

    3. The creation of a voltage difference across a conductive material (such as a coil of wire) by exposing it to a changing magnetic field. Induction is fundamental to hydroelectric power, in which water-powered turbines spin wire coils through strong magnetic fields. It is also the working principle underlying transformers and induction coils.

    4. The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by exposing it to the electric field of an electrically charged conductor.

    5. The building up of a net electric charge on a conductive material by separating its charge to create two oppositely charged regions, then bleeding off the charge from one region.

    1. The creation of a voltage difference across a conductive material (such as a coil of wire) by exposing it to a changing magnetic field. Induction is fundamental to hydroelectric power, in which water-powered turbines spin wire coils through strong magnetic fields. It is also the working principle underlying transformers and induction coils.

    2. The generation of an electric current in a conductor, such as a copper wire, by exposing it to the electric field of an electrically charged conductor.

    3. The building up of a net electric charge on a conductive material by separating its charge to create two oppositely charged regions, then bleeding off the charge from one region.


The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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induction in Culture

induction definition


A process of reasoning that moves from specific instances to predict general principles. (Compare deduction.)

induction definition


An effect in electrical systems in which electrical currents store energy temporarily in magnetic fields before that energy is returned to the circuit.

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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induction in Technology
logic
A method of proving statements about well-ordered sets. If S is a well-ordered set with ordering "IF for all t in S, t P(t) THEN P(s)
I.e. if P holds for anything less than s then it holds for s. In this case we say P is proved by induction.
The most common instance of proof by induction is induction over the natural numbers where we prove that some property holds for n=0 and that if it holds for n, it holds for n+1.
(In fact it is sufficient for "well-founded partial order on S, not necessarily a well-ordering of S.)
(1999-12-09)
The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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