inept

[in-ept, ih-nept]
adjective
1.
without skill or aptitude for a particular task or assignment; maladroit: He is inept at mechanical tasks. She is inept at dealing with people.
2.
generally awkward or clumsy; haplessly incompetent.
3.
inappropriate; unsuitable; out of place.
4.
absurd or foolish: an inept remark.

Origin:
1595–1605; < Latin ineptus, equivalent to in- in-3 + -eptus, combining form of aptus apt

ineptly, adverb
ineptness, noun

inapt, inept, unapt.


1. unskillful, bungling. 4. stupid, pointless, inane.


1. suited.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inept (ɪnˈɛpt)
 
adj
1.  awkward, clumsy, or incompetent
2.  not suitable, appropriate, or fitting; out of place
 
[C17: from Latin ineptus, from in-1 + aptus fitting, suitable]
 
in'eptitude
 
n
 
in'eptly
 
adv
 
in'eptness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inept
c.1600, from Fr. inepte (14c.), from L. ineptus "unsuitable, improper, tactless," from in- "not" + aptus "apt" (see apt).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
Running out of tea would have been inexcusably inept.
Disappointing because it reinforces the notion that scientists are socially
  inept and unconsciously repressed types.
When applied to the so-called general skills, however, they are inept.
It has however generally been used much more to protect inept and lazy faculty.
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