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inexpert

[in-eks-purt, in-ik-spurt] /ɪnˈɛks pɜrt, ˌɪn ɪkˈspɜrt/
adjective
1.
not expert; unskilled.
Origin
late Middle English
1400-1450
1400-50; late Middle English < Latin inexpertus. See in-3, expert
Related forms
inexpertly, adverb
inexpertness, noun
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for inexpert
  • On the charitable interpretation, they err on the side of caution, wary of confusing the inexpert reader.
  • Based on my admittedly inexpert understanding of derivatives, these were not an attempt to get around regulations.
  • In short, inexpert choosers sometimes do best when they rely on experts to choose for them.
  • However, while inexpert pleading is permitted, insufficient pleading is not.
  • For infrequent or inexpert users, a series of questions or prompts is easy to use and can help prevent certain errors.
  • Without delegation to experts an inexpert public, possessing the will, would lack the way.
British Dictionary definitions for inexpert

inexpert

/ɪnˈɛkspɜːt/
adjective
1.
not expert; unskilled or unskilful; inept
Derived Forms
inexpertly, adverb
inexpertness, noun
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inexpert
adj.

mid-15c., from in- (1) "not, opposite of" + expert (adj.), or else from Old French inexpert, from Latin inexpertus "without experience, unpracticed." Related: Inexpertly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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