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infallible

[in-fal-uh-buh l] /ɪnˈfæl ə bəl/
adjective
1.
absolutely trustworthy or sure:
an infallible rule.
2.
unfailing in effectiveness or operation; certain:
an infallible remedy.
3.
not fallible; exempt from liability to error, as persons, their judgment, or pronouncements:
an infallible principle.
4.
Roman Catholic Church. immune from fallacy or liability to error in expounding matters of faith or morals by virtue of the promise made by Christ to the Church.
noun
5.
an infallible person or thing.
Origin of infallible
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin infallibilis. See in-3, fallible
Related forms
infallibility, infallibleness, noun
infallibly, adverb
noninfallible, adjective
noninfallibly, adverb
Synonyms
1, 2. See reliable.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2016.
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Examples from the Web for infallible
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • And there is another truth which I wish to tell you now: our remedies are not infallible.

    Damaged Goods Upton Sinclair
  • Being just a human being, like the rest of us, it is not to be supposed that he was infallible.

  • Here was a quack doctor selling his infallible specifics from his cart, promising an unfailing cure for all manner of diseases.

    John Deane of Nottingham W.H.G. Kingston
  • His conclusions were as infallible as so many propositions of Euclid.

    A Study In Scarlet Arthur Conan Doyle
  • Has then the actual history of the World's Creation been ascertained from some other independent and infallible source?

British Dictionary definitions for infallible

infallible

/ɪnˈfæləbəl/
adjective
1.
not fallible; not liable to error
2.
not liable to failure; certain; sure: an infallible cure
3.
completely dependable or trustworthy
noun
4.
a person or thing that is incapable of error or failure
Derived Forms
infallibility, infallibleness, noun
infallibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for infallible
adj.

early 15c., from Medieval Latin infallibilis, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin fallibilis (see fallible). In reference to Popes, attested from 1870. Related: Infallibly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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