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infallible

[in-fal-uh-buh l] /ɪnˈfæl ə bəl/
adjective
1.
absolutely trustworthy or sure:
an infallible rule.
2.
unfailing in effectiveness or operation; certain:
an infallible remedy.
3.
not fallible; exempt from liability to error, as persons, their judgment, or pronouncements:
an infallible principle.
4.
Roman Catholic Church. immune from fallacy or liability to error in expounding matters of faith or morals by virtue of the promise made by Christ to the Church.
noun
5.
an infallible person or thing.
Origin
late Middle English
1375-1425
1375-1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin infallibilis. See in-3, fallible
Related forms
infallibility, infallibleness, noun
infallibly, adverb
noninfallible, adjective
noninfallibly, adverb
Synonyms
1, 2. See reliable.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for infallible
  • Although this so-called continuous speech-recognition approach has indeed improved accuracy, it is by no means infallible.
  • Most of them also believe to some degree in the infallible efficiency of private markets.
  • They have heard that no kind of birth control is really infallible.
  • However, be aware that even psychic animals are not infallible.
  • On the other hand, mathematics does not rely on evidence from fallible experimentation, but it is built on infallible logic.
  • Over a long period of time the formulae seem to be infallible: everything they predict is seen.
  • Fingerprints offer an infallible means of personal identification.
British Dictionary definitions for infallible

infallible

/ɪnˈfæləbəl/
adjective
1.
not fallible; not liable to error
2.
not liable to failure; certain; sure: an infallible cure
3.
completely dependable or trustworthy
noun
4.
a person or thing that is incapable of error or failure
Derived Forms
infallibility, infallibleness, noun
infallibly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for infallible
adj.

early 15c., from Medieval Latin infallibilis, from in- "not, opposite of" (see in- (1)) + Late Latin fallibilis (see fallible). In reference to Popes, attested from 1870. Related: Infallibly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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