inflame

[in-fleym]
verb (used with object), inflamed, inflaming.
1.
to kindle or excite (passions, desires, etc.).
2.
to arouse to a high degree of passion or feeling: His harangue inflamed the rabble.
3.
to incite or rouse, as to violence: His words inflamed the angry mob to riot.
4.
(of an emotion, as rage) to cause to redden or grow heated: Uncontrollable rage inflamed his face.
5.
to cause inflammation in: Her eyes were inflamed with crying.
6.
to raise (the blood, bodily tissue, etc.) to a morbid or feverish heat.
7.
to set aflame, ablaze, or afire; set on fire.
8.
to redden with or as with flames: The setting sun inflames the sky.
verb (used without object), inflamed, inflaming.
9.
to burst into flame; take fire.
10.
to be kindled, as passion.
11.
to become hot with passion, as the heart.
12.
to become excessively affected with inflammation.
Also, enflame.


Origin:
1300–50; in-2 + flame; replacing Middle English enflammen < Middle French enflammer < Latin inflammāre to kindle

inflamedness [in-fley-mid-nis] , noun
inflamer, noun
inflamingly, adverb
reinflame, verb, reinflamed, reinflaming.
uninflamed, adjective


1–3. See incite. 7. See kindle1.


2. cool, soothe.
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inflame (ɪnˈfleɪm)
 
vb
1.  to arouse or become aroused to violent emotion
2.  (tr) to increase or intensify; aggravate
3.  to produce inflammation in (a tissue, organ, or part) or (of a tissue, etc) to become inflamed
4.  to set or be set on fire; kindle
5.  (tr) to cause to redden
 
in'flamer
 
n
 
in'flamingly
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inflame
mid-14c., "to set on fire with passion," figurative use of L. inflammare "to set on fire, kindle," from in- "in" + flammare "to flame," from flamma "flame" (see flame). Literal sense of "to cause to burn" first recorded in English late 14c.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
There's warmth to the area because the veins are inflamed.
Infections from the microorganism settle under the eyelids, which become
  inflamed and thickened.
During such an infection, inflamed nodules within the membranes create pressure
  on the bone surface, leaving the lesions.
Tubes inside the lung become chronically inflamed, producing excess mucus.
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