inflated

[in-fley-tid]
adjective
1.
distended with air or gas; swollen.
2.
puffed up, as with pride.
3.
turgid or bombastic: his inflated prose.
4.
unduly increased in level: inflated costs.
5.
Economics. unduly expanded in amount, value, or size; characterized by inflation.
6.
Botany. hollow and enlarged or swelled out: inflated perianth.

Origin:
1645–55; inflate + -ed2

inflatedly, adverb
inflatedness, noun
underinflated, adjective
uninflated, adjective
Dictionary.com Unabridged

inflate

[in-fleyt]
verb (used with object), inflated, inflating.
1.
to distend; swell or puff out; dilate: The king cobra inflates its hood.
2.
to cause to expand or distend with air or gas: to inflate a balloon.
3.
to puff up with pride, satisfaction, etc.
4.
to elate.
5.
Economics. to expand (money, prices, an economy, etc.) unduly in amount, value, or size; affect with inflation.
verb (used without object), inflated, inflating.
6.
to become inflated.
7.
to increase, especially suddenly and substantially: The $10 subscription has inflated to $25.

Origin:
1470–80; < Latin inflātus past participle of inflāre to blow on or into, puff out, equivalent to in- in-2 + flā- blow2 + -tus past participle suffix

inflater, inflator, noun
overinflate, verb (used with object), overinflated, overinflating.
reinflate, verb, reinflated, reinflating.


1. See expand.


1. deflate.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To inflated
Collins
World English Dictionary
inflate (ɪnˈfleɪt)
 
vb
1.  to expand or cause to expand by filling with gas or air: she needed to inflate the tyres
2.  (tr) to cause to increase excessively; puff up; swell: to inflate one's opinion of oneself
3.  (tr) to cause inflation of (prices, money, etc)
4.  (tr) to raise in spirits; elate
5.  (intr) to undergo economic inflation
 
[C16: from Latin inflāre to blow into, from flāre to blow]
 
in'flatedly
 
adv
 
in'flatedness
 
n
 
in'flater
 
n
 
in'flator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

inflate
1530s, from L. inflatus, pp. of inflare (see inflation).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
We escape from inflated sentiment and return to a simplicity of moral feeling which belongs to the earlier days of the drama.
As added protection, divers cushioned the hull with a bed of inflated foam pillows.
If the intestine has been inflated and dried, the lips are of a semilunar shape.
By contrast, healthy lungs appear pinkish and inflated.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature