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inflame

[in-fleym] /ɪnˈfleɪm/
verb (used with object), inflamed, inflaming.
1.
to kindle or excite (passions, desires, etc.).
2.
to arouse to a high degree of passion or feeling:
His harangue inflamed the rabble.
3.
to incite or rouse, as to violence:
His words inflamed the angry mob to riot.
4.
(of an emotion, as rage) to cause to redden or grow heated:
Uncontrollable rage inflamed his face.
5.
to cause inflammation in:
Her eyes were inflamed with crying.
6.
to raise (the blood, bodily tissue, etc.) to a morbid or feverish heat.
7.
to set aflame, ablaze, or afire; set on fire.
8.
to redden with or as with flames:
The setting sun inflames the sky.
verb (used without object), inflamed, inflaming.
9.
to burst into flame; take fire.
10.
to be kindled, as passion.
11.
to become hot with passion, as the heart.
12.
to become excessively affected with inflammation.
Also, enflame.
Origin
1300-1350
1300-50; in-2 + flame; replacing Middle English enflammen < Middle French enflammer < Latin inflammāre to kindle
Related forms
inflamedness
[in-fley-mid-nis] /ɪnˈfleɪ mɪd nɪs/ (Show IPA),
noun
inflamer, noun
inflamingly, adverb
reinflame, verb, reinflamed, reinflaming.
uninflamed, adjective
Synonyms
1–3. See incite. 7. See kindle1 .
Antonyms
2. cool, soothe.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for inflame
  • Ozone can aggravate asthma, and can inflame and damage cells that line your lungs.
  • What those adventures were reported to have found, however, was sufficient to inflame the avidity of all their countrymen.
  • Good therapists usually work to resolve conflicts, not inflame them.
  • Some aspects of this response may inflame tensions between those who are winning and those who are losing.
  • The gel inside the implant, once released, can inflame the surrounding tissue.
  • Capsaicins inflame the airways, causing swelling and restriction.
  • The chances of further taxes will rise if bonuses continue to inflame tempers.
  • For instance, there has been no one to cast an eye over speeches to root out words that might inflame business sensibilities.
  • But it will surely be easier to inflame emotions than to soothe them.
  • There will always be propagandists and demagogues, seeking to inflame our baser natures to accomplish darker goals.
British Dictionary definitions for inflame

inflame

/ɪnˈfleɪm/
verb
1.
to arouse or become aroused to violent emotion
2.
(transitive) to increase or intensify; aggravate
3.
to produce inflammation in (a tissue, organ, or part) or (of a tissue, etc) to become inflamed
4.
to set or be set on fire; kindle
5.
(transitive) to cause to redden
Derived Forms
inflamer, noun
inflamingly, adverb
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for inflame
v.

mid-14c., "to set on fire with passion," from Latin inflammare "to set on fire, kindle," figuratively "to rouse, excite," from in- "in" (see in- (2)) + flammare "to flame," from flamma "flame" (see flame (n.)). Literal sense of "to cause to burn" first recorded in English late 14c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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