follow Dictionary.com

Capitol vs. capital? What's the difference?

inflow

[in-floh] /ˈɪnˌfloʊ/
noun
1.
something that flows in; influx.
Origin of inflow
1645-1655
1645-55; in-1 + flow
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for inflow
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Such coal was formed in that part of the swamp which was not stirred by the inflow of a river.

  • By pressing against the injured part it checked the inflow of water.

    The Giant of the North R.M. Ballantyne
  • This must be immediately closed to stop the inflow of water.

  • In this attitude, and with trembling heart, I watched the inflow of the tide.

    The Boy Tar Mayne Reid
  • The inflow and the outflow of labor and capital are more or less rapid in the various industries.

    The Principles of Economics Frank A. Fetter
  • We give up nothing but that which impedes the inflow of godly forces.

    The Hive Will Levington Comfort
  • The inflow at "X" and condensation fills recess "R" with water more or less cool.

    A Summer's Outing Carter H. Harrison
  • If the inflow exceeds the capacity of the pumps, water will flow into the ship until all buoyancy is lost.

    An Unsinkable Titanic John Bernard Walker
British Dictionary definitions for inflow

inflow

/ˈɪnˌfləʊ/
noun
1.
something, such as a liquid or gas, that flows in
2.
the amount or rate of flowing in
3.
Also called inflowing. the act of flowing in; influx
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for inflow
n.

1839, from in + flow (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for inflow

Many English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for inflow

12
14
Scrabble Words With Friends