infuriate

[v. in-fyoor-ee-eyt; adj. in-fyoor-ee-it]
verb (used with object), infuriated, infuriating.
1.
to make furious; enrage.
adjective
2.
Archaic. infuriated.

Origin:
1660–70; < Medieval Latin infuriātus past participle of infuriāre to madden, enrage. See in-2, fury, -ate1

infuriately, adverb
infuriation, noun
uninfuriated, adjective


1. anger. See enrage.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To infuriated
Collins
World English Dictionary
infuriate
 
vb
1.  (tr) to anger; annoy
 
adj
2.  archaic furious; infuriated
 
[C17: from Medieval Latin infuriāre (vb); see in-², fury]
 
in'furiately
 
adv
 
in'furiating
 
adj
 
in'furiatingly
 
adv
 
infuri'ation
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

infuriate
1667, from It. infuriato, from M.L. infuriatus, pp. of infuriare "to madden," from L. in furia "in a fury," from abl. of furia (see fury).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
But there was one aspect of the killing that especially alarmed and infuriated
  prosecutors.
It is easy to mistake the heckler as an adult, one of many mothers in the crowd
  infuriated by desegregation.
Its construction snarled traffic and infuriated drivers and pedestrians here
  for more than a decade.
He used to get infuriated with us for our constant side arguments about the
  material.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature