inoculation

[ih-nok-yuh-ley-shuhn]
noun
1.
the act or process of inoculating.
2.
an instance of inoculating.

Origin:
1400–50; late Middle English < Latin inoculātiōn- (stem of inoculātiō) an engrafting. See inoculate, -ion

noninoculation, noun
postinoculation, adjective
reinoculation, noun
self-inoculation, noun
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
inoculate (ɪˈnɒkjʊˌleɪt)
 
vb
1.  to introduce (the causative agent of a disease) into the body of (a person or animal), in order to induce immunity
2.  (tr) to introduce (microorganisms, esp bacteria) into (a culture medium)
3.  (tr) to cause to be influenced or imbued, as with ideas or opinions
 
[C15: from Latin inoculāre to implant, from in-² + oculus eye, bud]
 
inocu'lation
 
n
 
in'oculative
 
adj
 
in'oculator
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

inoculation in·oc·u·la·tion (ĭ-nŏk'yə-lā'shən)
n.
The act or an instance of inoculating, especially the introduction of an antigenic substance or vaccine into the body to produce immunity to a specific disease.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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American Heritage
Science Dictionary
inoculation   (ĭ-nŏk'yə-lā'shən)  Pronunciation Key 
  1. The introduction of a serum, a vaccine, or an antigenic substance into the body of a person or an animal, especially as a means to produce or boost immunity to a specific disease.

  2. The introduction of a microorganism or an agent of disease into an host organism or a growth medium.


inoculate verb
The American Heritage® Science Dictionary
Copyright © 2002. Published by Houghton Mifflin. All rights reserved.
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American Heritage
Cultural Dictionary
inoculation [(i-nok-yuh-lay-shuhn)]

The introduction of an antigen into the body, usually by injection, in order to stimulate the production of antibodies to produce immunity to an infectious disease. (See immunization.)

The American Heritage® New Dictionary of Cultural Literacy, Third Edition
Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
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Encyclopedia Britannica
Encyclopedia

inoculation

process of producing immunity and method of vaccination that consists of introduction of the infectious agent onto an abraded or absorptive skin surface instead of inserting the substance in the tissues by means of a hollow needle, as in injection. Of the common vaccines, only smallpox vaccine is routinely inoculated. The term inoculation is also commonly used more broadly to mean any introduction of antigenic substances into the tissues. See also immunization; vaccine.

Learn more about inoculation with a free trial on Britannica.com.

Encyclopedia Britannica, 2008. Encyclopedia Britannica Online.
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Example sentences
Another case of illness following inoculation with typhoid fever vaccine became
  known yesterday.
Animal-welfare groups argue that a better way to prevent rabies would be to
  enforce inoculation of animals against the disease.
One of the myths about inoculation was that it did not produce a true smallpox
  in the patient but a spurious case of chicken pox.
For some older firms and even some newcomers, these deals proved the perfect
  inoculation against an indifferent stock market.
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