insensate

[in-sen-seyt, -sit]
adjective
1.
not endowed with sensation; inanimate: insensate stone.
2.
without human feeling or sensitivity; cold; cruel; brutal.
3.
without sense, understanding, or judgment; foolish.

Origin:
1510–20; < Late Latin insēnsātus irrational. See in-3, sensate

insensately, adverb
insensateness, noun


1. lifeless, inorganic. 2. insensible. 3. stupid, irrational, senseless, witless, dumb.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To insensate
Collins
World English Dictionary
insensate (ɪnˈsɛnseɪt, -sɪt)
 
adj
1.  lacking sensation or consciousness
2.  insensitive; unfeeling
3.  foolish; senseless
 
in'sensately
 
adv
 
in'sensateness
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

insensate
1519, from L.L. insensatus "irrational, foolish," from L. in- "not" + sensatus "gifted with sense." Insensate means "not capable of feeling sensation," often "inanimate;" insensible means "lacking the power to feel with the senses," hence, often, "unconscious;" insensitive (1610), from M.L. sensitivus,
means "having little or no reaction to what is perceived by one's senses," often "tactless."
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Example sentences
The story edges near to diatribe in its horror of insensate patriotic fury.
Surgical debridement and limited amputations may be required for infections related to wounds on the insensate hand.
If untreated, the results can be catastrophic with an insensate, contracted leg.
Related Words
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;