insufficient

[in-suh-fish-uhnt]
adjective
1.
not sufficient; lacking in what is necessary or required: an insufficient answer.
2.
deficient in force, quality, or amount; inadequate: insufficient protection.

Origin:
1350–1400; Middle English < Late Latin insufficient- (stem of insufficiēns). See in-3, sufficient

insufficiently, adverb


1. inadequate, scanty, deficient.
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World English Dictionary
insufficient (ˌɪnsəˈfɪʃənt)
 
adj
not sufficient; inadequate or deficient
 
insuf'ficiently
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

insufficient
late 14c., from O.Fr. insufficient, from L. insufficientem (nom. insufficiens), from in- "not" + sufficientem (see sufficient). Originally of persons, "inadequate, unable;" of things, from 1494.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

insufficient in·suf·fi·cient (ĭn'sə-fĭsh'ənt)
adj.

  1. Not sufficient.

  2. Incapable of proper functioning.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Example sentences
There may be signs of chronically insufficient oxygen levels in the blood.
The second could be that there is insufficient demand.
The bears then come onto land, where they have insufficient food until the sea
  ice refreezes in the fall.
Though the behemoths are endangered, the land set aside for them is
  insufficient.
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