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insulting

[in-suhl-ting] /ɪnˈsʌl tɪŋ/
adjective
1.
giving or causing insult; characterized by affronting rudeness, insolence, etc.
Origin
1585-1595
1585-95; insult + -ing2
Related forms
insultingly, adverb
uninsulting, adjective
Synonyms
rude, discourteous, abusive, derogatory, offensive, nasty.

insult

[v. in-suhlt; n. in-suhlt] /v. ɪnˈsʌlt; n. ˈɪn sʌlt/
verb (used with object)
1.
to treat or speak to insolently or with contemptuous rudeness; affront.
2.
to affect as an affront; offend or demean.
3.
Archaic. to attack; assault.
verb (used without object)
4.
Archaic. to behave with insolent triumph; exult contemptuously (usually followed by on, upon, or over).
noun
5.
an insolent or contemptuously rude action or remark; affront.
6.
something having the effect of an affront:
That book is an insult to one's intelligence.
7.
Medicine/Medical.
  1. an injury or trauma.
  2. an agent that inflicts this.
8.
Archaic. an attack or assault.
Origin
1560-70; < Latin insultāre to jump on, insult, equivalent to in- in-2 + -sultāre, combining form of saltāre to jump; see saltant
Related forms
insultable, adjective
insulter, noun
preinsult, verb (used with object)
quasi-insulted, adjective
uninsultable, adjective
uninsulted, adjective
Synonyms
1. offend, scorn, injure, abuse. 5. offense, outrage. Insult, indignity, affront, slight imply an act that injures another's honor, self-respect, etc. Insult implies such insolence of speech or manner as deeply humiliates or wounds one's feelings and arouses to anger. Indignity is especially used of inconsiderate, contemptuous treatment toward one entitled to respect. Affront implies open disrespect or offense shown, as it were, to the face. Slight may imply inadvertent indifference or disregard, which may also indicate ill-concealed contempt.
Antonyms
1, 5. compliment.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples for insulting
  • The rule, and the theory it implies, are hardly less insulting to believers than to infidels.
  • To environmentalists, clean coal is an insulting oxymoron.
  • For them, the advice is confusing and heartbreaking, maybe even insulting.
  • If you can't talk without driving into the margins, or insulting someone, try not talking.
  • But he found the actual salary insulting, declined payment, and never got around to teaching.
  • There is no insulting someone who lives in a self-reinforcing fantasy world.
  • The researchers make these resonators on a thin silicon layer mounted on an insulting silicon-oxide layer.
  • Her email was coolly insulting while still asking for a change in the grade.
  • It is insulting to blacks and can ultimately only be divisive.
  • There's no evidence that belittling or demeaning children in an insulting way is good for them.
British Dictionary definitions for insulting

insult

verb (transitive) (ɪnˈsʌlt)
1.
to treat, mention, or speak to rudely; offend; affront
2.
(obsolete) to assault; attack
noun (ˈɪnsʌlt)
3.
an offensive or contemptuous remark or action; affront; slight
4.
a person or thing producing the effect of an affront some television is an insult to intelligence
5.
(med) an injury or trauma
6.
add insult to injury, to make an unfair or unacceptable situation even worse
Derived Forms
insulter, noun
Word Origin
C16: from Latin insultāre to jump upon, from in-² + saltāre to jump
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for insulting
insult
c.1570, "triumph over in an arrogant way," from L. insultare "to assail, to leap upon" (already used by Cicero in sense of "insult, scoff at, revile"), freq. of insilire "leap at or upon," from in- "on, at" + salire "to leap" (see salient). Sense of "to verbally abuse, affront, assail with disrespect" is from 1620. The noun is recorded 1603 in the sense of "attack;" 1671 as "an act of insulting." To add insult to injury translates L. injuriæ contumeliam addere.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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insulting in Medicine

insult in·sult (ĭn'sŭlt')
n.
A bodily injury, irritation, or trauma.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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Idioms and Phrases with insulting
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
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