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[in-trep-id] /ɪnˈtrɛp ɪd/
resolutely fearless; dauntless:
an intrepid explorer.
Origin of intrepid
1690-1700; < Latin intrepidus, equivalent to in- in-3 + trepidus anxious; see trepidation
Related forms
intrepidity, intrepidness, noun
intrepidly, adverb
brave, courageous, bold.
timid. Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for intrepid
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • Hearts of noble strain, intrepid, generous; the clear head, the keen eye; a spirit equal alike to good fortune and to ill.

  • Laurent had become an intrepid swimmer, and an indefatigable oarsman.

    Therese Raquin Emile Zola
  • The girl had inherited from her forbears a touch of that intrepid spirit that prevailed amid the hills.

    The Night Riders Henry C. Wood
  • "I am ready, monsieur," said she, and her boyish voice had an intrepid ring.

    St. Martin's Summer Rafael Sabatini
  • He then exhibits character in its most intrepid form, and embodies the highest idea of manliness.

    Character Samuel Smiles
British Dictionary definitions for intrepid


fearless; daring; bold
Derived Forms
intrepidity, intrepidness, noun
intrepidly, adverb
Word Origin
C17: from Latin intrepidus, from in-1 + trepidus fearful, timid
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for intrepid

1620s (implied in intrepidness), from French intrépide (16c.) and directly from Latin intrepidus "unshaken, undaunted," from in- "not" (see in- (1)) + trepidus "alarmed" (see trepidation). Related: Intrepidly.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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