intricate

[in-tri-kit]
adjective
1.
having many interrelated parts or facets; entangled or involved: an intricate maze.
2.
complex; complicated; hard to understand, work, or make: an intricate machine.

Origin:
1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin intrīcātus, past participle of intrīcāre to entangle, equivalent to in- in-2 + trīc(ae) perplexities + -ātus -ate1

intricately, adverb
intricateness, noun
unintricate, adjective
unintricately, adverb
unintricateness, noun


1. knotty, tangled, labyrinthine.
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World English Dictionary
intricate (ˈɪntrɪkɪt)
 
adj
1.  difficult to understand; obscure; complex; puzzling
2.  entangled or involved: intricate patterns
 
[C15: from Latin intrīcāre to entangle, perplex, from in-² + trīcae trifles, perplexities]
 
'intricacy
 
n
 
'intricateness
 
n
 
'intricately
 
adv

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

intricate
c.1470, from L. intricatus "entangled," pp. of intricare "to entangle, perplex, embarrass," from in- "in" + tricæ (pl.) "perplexities, hindrances, toys, tricks," of uncertain origin (cf. extricate).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
The intricate box, lined with blue velvet, contains pieces of mirror mounted on
  the rear surface.
Such intricate structures would only be recovered in instances of exceptional
  preservation.
The muscular structure of the heart consists of bands of fibers, which present
  an exceedingly intricate interlacement.
They had arrived from another valley and were attempting an intricate series of
  crossings.
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