jostle

[jos-uhl]
verb (used with object), jostled, jostling.
1.
to bump, push, shove, brush against, or elbow roughly or rudely.
2.
to drive or force by, or as if by, pushing or shoving: The crowd jostled him into the subway.
3.
to exist in close contact or proximity with: The three families jostle each other in the small house.
4.
to contend with: rival gangs continually jostling each other.
5.
to unsettle; disturb: The thought jostled her complacency.
6.
Slang. to pick the pocket of.
verb (used without object), jostled, jostling.
7.
to bump or brush against someone or something, as in passing or in a crowd; push or shove (often followed by with, for, or against ): He jostled for position.
8.
to exist in close contact or proximity with someone or something.
9.
to compete; contend.
10.
Slang. to pick pockets.
noun
11.
a shock, push, bump, or brush against someone or something.
Also, justle.


Origin:
1350–1400; variant (in Middle English, variant spelling) of justle, equivalent to just(en) to joust + -le

jostlement, noun
jostler, noun
unjostled, adjective
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Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
jostle (ˈdʒɒsəl)
 
vb
1.  to bump or push (someone) roughly
2.  to come or bring into contact
3.  to force (one's way) by pushing
 
n
4.  the act of jostling
5.  a rough bump or push
 
[C14: see joust]
 
'jostlement
 
n
 
'jostler
 
n

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

jostle
1546, formed from jousten (see joust) + frequentative suffix -tle. The usual spelling 17c.-18c. was justle. An earlier meaning of the word was "to have sex with" (c.1400).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
When the volume was high, the unit produced clicking noises with every bump and
  jostle.
Waiting for news of their relatives inside the maternity wards, they jostle
  urgently to beg a foreign visitor for help.
The magnets jostle the electrons until they emit light pulses.
Turbo's lag may jostle your latte, and its ever-present whine is grating.
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