Jugging

jug

1 [juhg]
noun
1.
a large container usually made of earthenware, metal, or glass, commonly having a handle, a narrow neck, and sometimes a cap or cork.
2.
the contents of such a container; jugful: a jug of wine.
3.
Slang. jail; prison.
4.
jugs, Slang: Vulgar. a woman's breasts.
verb (used with object), jugged, jugging.
5.
to put into a jug.
6.
to stew (meat) in an earthenware jug.
7.
Slang. to put in jail; imprison.

Origin:
1530–40; perhaps special use of Jug hypocoristic form of Joan, woman's name

Dictionary.com Unabridged

jug

2 [juhg]
noun
1.
a sound made by a bird, especially a nightingale.
verb (used without object), jugged, jugging.
2.
to make such a sound.

Origin:
1515–25; imitative

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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World English Dictionary
jug (dʒʌɡ)
 
n
1.  US equivalent: pitcher a vessel for holding or pouring liquids, usually having a handle and a spout or lip
2.  (Austral), (NZ) such a vessel used as a kettle: an electric jug
3.  (US) a large vessel with a narrow mouth
4.  Also called: jugful the amount of liquid held by a jug
5.  informal (Brit) a glass of alcoholic drink, esp beer
6.  a slang word for jail
 
vb , jugs, jugging, jugged
7.  to stew or boil (meat, esp hare) in an earthenware container
8.  slang (tr) to put in jail
 
[C16: probably from Jug, nickname from girl's name Joan]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

jug
"deep vessel for carrying liquids," 1538, jugge, variant of jubbe, of unknown origin, perhaps from jug "a low woman, a maidservant" (mid-16c.), an alteration of a common personal name, Joan or Judith. Use as a musical instrument is attested from 1946. Jughead "klutz" is from 1926; jughandle "tight curved
road used for turns" is from 1961. Jugs for "woman's breasts" first recorded 1920 in Australian slang, short for milk jugs.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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