Try Our Apps


Supposedly vs. Supposably


[kich-uh n] /ˈkɪtʃ ən/
a room or place equipped for cooking.
culinary department; cuisine:
This restaurant has a fine Italian kitchen.
the staff or equipment of a kitchen.
of, relating to, or designed for use in a kitchen:
kitchen window; kitchen curtains.
employed in or assigned to a kitchen:
kitchen help.
of or resembling a pidginized language, especially one used for communication between employers and servants or other employees who do not speak the same language.
Origin of kitchen
before 1000; Middle English kichene, Old English cyceneLatin coquīna, equivalent to coqu(ere) to cook + -īna -ine1; cf. cuisine
Related forms
kitchenless, adjective
kitcheny, adjective
outkitchen, noun Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for kitchen
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • There was a moment's silence between the two in the kitchen, but the spell was broken.

  • Your eggs are carried from the kitchen to the dining-room table on a plate.

    Ancient Man Hendrik Willem van Loon
  • At last they met a poor little girl in the kitchen, who said, 'Oh!

    The Yellow Fairy Book Leonora Blanche Alleyne Lang
  • Robert hurried home, and rushed into the kitchen where his mother was at work.

    Brave and Bold Horatio Alger
  • They had the house to themselves, moreover, save for the native boy in the kitchen.

    Aletta Bertram Mitford
British Dictionary definitions for kitchen


  1. a room or part of a building equipped for preparing and cooking food
  2. (as modifier): a kitchen table
Word Origin
Old English cycene, ultimately from Late Latin coquīna, from Latin coquere to cook; see kiln
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for kitchen

c.1200, from Old English cycene, from West Germanic *kokina (cf. Middle Dutch cökene, Old High German chuhhina, German Küche, Danish kjøkken), probably borrowed from Vulgar Latin *cocina (cf. French cuisine, Spanish cocina), variant of Latin coquina "kitchen," from fem. of coquinus "of cooks," from coquus "cook," from coquere "to cook" (see cook (n.)).

The Old English word might be directly from Vulgar Latin. Kitchen cabinet "informal but powerful set of advisors" is American English slang, 1832, originally in reference to administration of President Andrew Jackson. Kitchen midden (1863) in archaeology translates Danish kjøkken mødding. Surname Kitchener ("one in charge of a monastic kitchen") is from early 14c. Old English also had cycenðenung "service in the kitchen."

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
Slang definitions & phrases for kitchen



  1. The buttocks; rump; ass: I've had it up to my keister with these leaks/What a sensation; we'll knock them on their keister (1931+)
  2. A rear trousers pocket (1930s+ Pickpockets)
  3. A suitcase that opens into a display of goods: the typical ''keister'' of the street hawker (1930s+ Hawkers)
  4. A safe; strongbox; crib (1914+ Underworld)

[fr British dialect kist or German Kiste, ''chest, box,'' transferred to the buttocks perhaps by the pickpocket sense or by the notion that something may be concealed in the rectum]

The Dictionary of American Slang, Fourth Edition by Barbara Ann Kipfer, PhD. and Robert L. Chapman, Ph.D.
Copyright (C) 2007 by HarperCollins Publishers.
Cite This Source
Idioms and Phrases with kitchen
The American Heritage® Idioms Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for kitchen

All English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for kitchen

Scrabble Words With Friends

Nearby words for kitchen