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lackluster

[lak-luhs-ter] /ˈlækˌlʌs tər/
adjective
1.
lacking brilliance or radiance; dull:
lackluster eyes.
2.
lacking liveliness, vitality, spirit, or enthusiasm:
a lackluster performance.
noun
3.
a lack of brilliance or vitality.
Also, especially British, lacklustre.
Origin
1590-1600
1590-1600; lack + luster1
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for lackluster
  • Unfortunately, these are precisely the strategies that media companies pursued aggressively during the past lackluster decade.
  • One can easily miss a radiant poem amid the many lackluster ones.
  • In the last couple of debates, particularly, his performance has been lackluster.
  • What's more, with a lackluster stock market, pension funds and rich people had to find more promising places to put their dough.
  • lackluster growth in mortgage applications despite historically low interest rates reflects the decline in housing demand.
  • Lingering threats of terrorism, lackluster corporate earnings and the soft economy are clearly crimping stock prices.
  • Ryan got off to a lackluster start this season, but he's been getting progressively better.
  • But while market demand has expanded over the years, the number of skilled workers able to meet this need has remained lackluster.
  • Ironically, they did it in an effort to push through a partisan and lackluster ethics plan.
  • Student performance is also lackluster in mathematics.
British Dictionary definitions for lackluster

lacklustre

/ˈlækˌlʌstə/
adjective
1.
lacking force, brilliance, or vitality
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lackluster
adj.

also lack-luster, c.1600, first attested in "As You Like It," from lack + luster. Combinations with lack- were frequent in 16c., e.g. lackland (1590s), of a landless man; lack-Latin (1530s), of an ignorant priest.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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