lair

1 [lair]
noun
1.
a den or resting place of a wild animal: The cougar retired to its lair.
2.
a secluded or hidden place, especially a secret retreat or base of operations; a hideout or hideaway: a pirate's lair.
3.
British. a place in which to lie or rest; a bed.
verb (used with object)
4.
to place in a lair.
5.
to serve as a lair for.
verb (used without object)
6.
to go to, lie in, or have a lair.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English leir, Old English leger; cognate with Dutch, Old High German leger bed, camp; akin to lie2

Dictionary.com Unabridged

lair

2 [lair]
noun
1.
British Dialect. mud; mire.
verb (used without object)
2.
Scot. to sink or stick in mud or mire.

Origin:
1250–1300; v. use of Middle English lair clay, mire < Old Norse leir clay, loam

lair

3 [lair]
noun Chiefly Scot.
lore; learning.

Origin:
Middle English (north and Scots) lare, Old English lār lore

lair

4 [lair]
noun Australian Informal.
a man who dresses garishly and is crude or vulgar; showoff.

Origin:
1930–35; back formation from lairy

Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Collins
World English Dictionary
lair1 (lɛə)
 
n
1.  the resting place of a wild animal
2.  informal a place of seclusion or hiding
3.  an enclosure or shed for farm animals
4.  (Scot) the ground for a grave in a cemetery
 
vb
5.  (intr) (esp of a wild animal) to retreat to or rest in a lair
6.  (tr) to drive or place (an animal) in a lair
 
[Old English leger; related to lie² and Old High German leger bed]

lair2 (ler)
 
n, —vb
a Scot word for mire
 
[from Old Norse leir mud]

lair3 (lɛə)
 
n
1.  a flashy man who shows off
 
vb
2.  (intr; foll by up or around) to behave or dress like a lair
 
[perhaps from leer]

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
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Etymonline
Word Origin & History

lair
O.E. leger "bed, couch, grave, act or place of lying down," from P.Gmc. *legran (cf. O.N. legr, O.Fris. legor, O.H.G. legar, Ger. Lager, Goth. ligrs "place of lying"), from *leg-, the root of lie (q.v.). Meaning "animal's den" is from c.1420.
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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Example sentences
It is often not even apparent until the weakened bat comes out of its lair from
  hibernation now too weak to survive.
Holed up in a secret lair as they braved the fury of the streets, he seemed
  hopelessly out of date and out of touch.
And what is oddest about the essay's power to lure us into its lair is how it
  goes about this work.
Then a huge barrow is constructed over the remains of the pyre, and all the
  treasure taken from the dragon's lair is placed in it.
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