learning

[lur-ning]
noun
1.
knowledge acquired by systematic study in any field of scholarly application.
2.
the act or process of acquiring knowledge or skill.
3.
Psychology. the modification of behavior through practice, training, or experience.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English lerning, Old English leornung. See learn, -ing1

unlearning, adjective


1. Learning, erudition, lore, scholarship refer to knowledge existing or acquired. Learning is the most general term. It may refer to knowledge obtained by systematic study or by trial and error: a man of learning; learning in the real world. Erudition suggests a thorough, formal, and profound sort of knowledge obtained by extensive research; it is especially applied to knowledge in fields other than those of mathematics and physical sciences: a man of vast erudition in languages. Lore is accumulated knowledge in a particular field, especially of a curious, anecdotal, or traditional nature; the word is now somewhat literary: nature lore; local lore. Scholarship is the formalized learning that is taught in schools, especially as actively employed by a person trying to master some field of knowledge or extend its bounds: high standards of scholarship in history.
Dictionary.com Unabridged

learn

[lurn]
verb (used with object), learned [lurnd] or learnt, learning.
1.
to acquire knowledge of or skill in by study, instruction, or experience: to learn French; to learn to ski.
2.
to become informed of or acquainted with; ascertain: to learn the truth.
3.
to memorize: He learned the poem so he could recite it at the dinner.
4.
to gain (a habit, mannerism, etc.) by experience, exposure to example, or the like; acquire: She learned patience from her father.
5.
(of a device or machine, especially a computer) to perform an analogue of human learning with artificial intelligence.
6.
Nonstandard. to instruct in; teach.
verb (used without object), learned [lurnd] or learnt, learning.
7.
to acquire knowledge or skill: to learn rapidly.
8.
to become informed (usually followed by of ): to learn of an accident.

Origin:
before 900; Middle English lernen, Old English leornian to learn, read, ponder (cognate with German lernen); akin to lesan to glean (cognate with German lesen to read). See lear

learnable, adjective
mislearn, verb, mislearned or mislearnt, mislearning.
outlearn, verb (used with object), outlearned or outlearnt, outlearning.
relearn, verb, relearned or relearnt, relearning.

learn, teach.


1. Learn, ascertain, detect, discover imply adding to one's store of facts. To learn is to add to one's knowledge or information: to learn a language. To ascertain is to verify facts by inquiry or analysis: to ascertain the truth about an event. To detect implies becoming aware of something that had been obscure, secret, or concealed: to detect a flaw in reasoning. To discover is used with objective clauses as a synonym of learn in order to suggest that the new information acquired is surprising to the learner: I discovered that she had been married before.
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
Cite This Source Link To learning
Collins
World English Dictionary
learn (lɜːn)
 
vb , learns, learning, learned, learnt
1.  (when tr, may take a clause as object) to gain knowledge of (something) or acquire skill in (some art or practice)
2.  (tr) to commit to memory
3.  (tr) to gain by experience, example, etc
4.  (intr; often foll by of or about) to become informed; know
5.  not standard to teach
 
[Old English leornian; related to Old High German lirnen]
 
'learnable
 
adj

learning (ˈlɜːnɪŋ)
 
n
1.  knowledge gained by study; instruction or scholarship
2.  the act of gaining knowledge
3.  psychol any relatively permanent change in behaviour that occurs as a direct result of experience

Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 10th Edition
2009 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009
Cite This Source
Etymonline
Word Origin & History

learn
O.E. leornian "to get knowledge, be cultivated," from P.Gmc. *liznojan (cf. O.Fris. lernia, O.H.G. lernen, Ger. lernen "to learn," Goth. lais "I know), with a base sense of "to follow or find the track," from PIE *leis- "track." Related to Ger. Gleis "track," and to O.E. læst "sole of the foot"
(see last (n.)). The transitive sense (He learned me how to read), now vulgar, was acceptable from c.1200 until early 19c., from O.E. læran "to teach" (cf. M.E. lere, Ger. lehren "to teach;" see lore), and is preserved in the adj. learned "having knowledge gained by study" (c.1340).
Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
American Heritage
Medical Dictionary

learning learn·ing (lûr'nĭng)
n.

  1. The act, process, or experience of gaining knowledge or skill.

  2. Knowledge or skill gained through schooling or study.

  3. Behavioral modification especially through experience or conditioning.

The American Heritage® Stedman's Medical Dictionary
Copyright © 2002, 2001, 1995 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company.
Cite This Source
Example sentences
E-learning has made higher education more convenient for millions of students.
How tenure protects free speech and students' learning conditions.
Two-thirds of those presidents said online learning was comparable to
  face-to-face instruction.
For adults to go on learning languages easily, they need to recapture the
  indifference of childhood.
Copyright © 2014 Dictionary.com, LLC. All rights reserved.
  • Please Login or Sign Up to use the Recent Searches feature
FAVORITES
RECENT

;