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larder

[lahr-der] /ˈlɑr dər/
noun
1.
a room or place where food is kept; pantry.
2.
a supply of food.
Origin
1275-1325
1275-1325; Middle English < Anglo-French; Old French lardier. See lard, -er2
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for larder
  • But in land so rich in game, they could quickly restore their larder.
  • She had a larder on the north side of the house with a wire grid to let cool air in from the shade.
  • Original crofter's cottage overlooking sea uses island as organic larder for world-famous cuisine.
  • But animals roused from hibernation by warmer temperatures in late winter or early spring may find nature's larder bare.
  • It was a giant key, and it unlocked the larder, where the food was stored.
  • Unfortunately, those fatty acids may be running low in the global larder.
  • Horses in the corral are larder for the long winter.
  • Stock up here on smart staples for your wardrobe, writing desk and larder.
  • The surrounding communities have eaten from the rainforest's rich larder for generations.
  • Nourished by fishermen, farmers and ranchers in the region, local chefs have an enviable larder with which to work.
British Dictionary definitions for larder

larder

/ˈlɑːdə/
noun
1.
a room or cupboard, used as a store for food
Word Origin
C14: from Old French lardier, from lard
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for larder
n.

c.1300, "supply of salt pork, bacon, and other meats," later in reference to the room for processing and storing such (late 14c.), from Anglo-French larder, Old French lardier "a place for meats," from Medieval Latin lardarium "a room for meats," from Latin lardum "lard, bacon" (see lard (n.)). Meaning "department of the royal household or of a monastic house in charge of stored meats" is mid-15c. Surname Lardner "person in charge of a larder" is attested from mid-12c.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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