follow Dictionary.com

Denotation vs. Connotation

leavening

[lev-uh-ning] /ˈlɛv ə nɪŋ/
noun
1.
Also called leavening agent. a substance used to produce fermentation in dough or batter; leaven.
2.
the act or process of causing to ferment by leaven.
3.
leaven (def 3).
Origin of leavening
1600-1610
1600-10; leaven + -ing1

leaven

[lev-uh n] /ˈlɛv ən/
noun
1.
a substance, as yeast or baking powder, that causes fermentation and expansion of dough or batter.
2.
fermented dough reserved for producing fermentation in a new batch of dough.
3.
an element that produces an altering or transforming influence.
verb (used with object)
4.
to add leaven to (dough or batter) and cause to rise.
5.
to permeate with an altering or transforming element.
Origin
1300-50; Middle English levain < Anglo-French, Old French levain < Vulgar Latin *levāmen, equivalent to Latin levā(re) to raise + -men deverbal noun suffix (probably not continuous with Latin levāmen means of alleviating, solace)
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
Cite This Source
Examples from the Web for leavening
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • This little yet mighty engine is much less instrumental in leavening and leveling the soil in New England than in Old.

    Fresh Fields John Burroughs
  • The leaven, silently but surely, was leavening the surrounding mass.

    The Oxford Reformers Frederic Seebohm
  • Free thought is leavening Christianity, and is moulding the old faith against its will.

    My Path to Atheism Annie Besant
  • leavening material, for example, will serve to make clear the need for accuracy in measuring.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1 Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
  • There was a leavening of women in this male mass of loggers, fishermen, and what-not.

    The Hidden Places Bertrand W. Sinclair
  • As is known by this time, leavening agents are the materials used to leaven, or make light, any kind of flour mixture.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1 Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
  • As in the case of soda alone, these leavening agents should be sifted with the dry ingredients.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1 Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
  • In hot breads of this kind, aeration is used as the leavening agent.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1 Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
  • Formerly, it was the custom to mix these leavening substances in this way, and then to add them to the other ingredients.

    Woman's Institute Library of Cookery, Vol. 1 Woman's Institute of Domestic Arts and Sciences
British Dictionary definitions for leavening

leaven

/ˈlɛvən/
noun
1.
any substance that produces fermentation in dough or batter, such as yeast, and causes it to rise
2.
a piece of such a substance kept to ferment a new batch of dough
3.
an agency or influence that produces a gradual change
verb (transitive)
4.
to cause fermentation in (dough or batter)
5.
to pervade, causing a gradual change, esp with some moderating or enlivening influence
Word Origin
C14: via Old French ultimately from Latin levāmen relief, (hence, raising agent, leaven), from levāre to raise
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
Cite This Source
Word Origin and History for leavening

leaven

n.

mid-14c., from Old French levain "leaven, sourdough" (12c.), from Latin levamen "alleviation, mitigation," but used in Vulgar Latin in its literal sense of "a means of lifting, something that raises," from levare "to raise" (see lever). Figurative use from late 14c.

v.

c.1400, from leaven (n.). Related: Leavened; leavening.

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
Cite This Source
leavening in the Bible

(1.) Heb. seor (Ex. 12:15, 19; 13:7; Lev. 2:11), the remnant of dough from the preceding baking which had fermented and become acid. (2.) Heb. hamets, properly "ferment." In Num. 6:3, "vinegar of wine" is more correctly "fermented wine." In Ex. 13:7, the proper rendering would be, "Unfermented things [Heb. matstsoth] shall be consumed during the seven days; and there shall not be seen with thee fermented things [hamets], and there shall not be seen with thee leavened mass [seor] in all thy borders." The chemical definition of ferment or yeast is "a substance in a state of putrefaction, the atoms of which are in a continual motion." The use of leaven was strictly forbidden in all offerings made to the Lord by fire (Lev. 2:11; 7:12; 8:2; Num. 6:15). Its secretly penetrating and diffusive power is referred to in 1 Cor. 5:6. In this respect it is used to illustrate the growth of the kingdom of heaven both in the individual heart and in the world (Matt. 13:33). It is a figure also of corruptness and of perverseness of heart and life (Matt. 16:6, 11; Mark 8:15; 1 Cor. 5:7, 8).

Easton's 1897 Bible Dictionary
Cite This Source

Word of the Day

Difficulty index for leavening

Some English speakers likely know this word

Word Value for leavening

13
18
Scrabble Words With Friends