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Pore Over vs. Pour Over


[lahyk-wahyz] /ˈlaɪkˌwaɪz/
moreover; in addition; also; too:
She is likewise a fine lawyer.
in like manner; in the same way; similarly:
I'm tempted to do likewise.
Origin of likewise
late Middle English
1400-50; late Middle English; earlier in like wise in a like way. See like1, wise2 Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2015.
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Examples from the Web for likewise
Contemporary Examples
Historical Examples
  • School and church have their place for young and old, and they likewise must be considered.

    A Stake in the Land Peter Alexander Speek
  • Here the posterity of your Mynherr Knickerbocker do likewise.

    The Spenders Harry Leon Wilson
  • The background of each picture is likewise perfectly appropriate.

    Sir Joshua Reynolds Estelle M. Hurll
  • “I will send her some, and likewise of mine own comfits and cakes,” said Mistress Dennet.

    The Armourer's Prentices Charlotte M. Yonge
  • The books with their fine bindings were likewise a source of particular delight.

    Bought and Paid For Arthur Hornblow
British Dictionary definitions for likewise


in addition; moreover; also
in like manner; similarly
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for likewise

mid-15c., from the phrase in like wise "in the same manner" (mid-15c.), from like (adj.) + wise (n.).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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