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lore1

[lawr, lohr] /lɔr, loʊr/
noun
1.
the body of knowledge, especially of a traditional, anecdotal, or popular nature, on a particular subject:
the lore of herbs.
2.
learning, knowledge, or erudition.
3.
Archaic.
  1. the process or act of teaching; instruction.
  2. something that is taught; lesson.
Origin
950
before 950; Middle English; Old English lār; cognate with Dutch leer, German Lehre teaching. See learn
Related forms
loreless, adjective
Synonyms
1. wisdom. See learning.

lore2

[lawr, lohr] /lɔr, loʊr/
noun, Zoology
1.
the space between the eye and the bill of a bird, or a corresponding space in other animals, as snakes.
Origin
1615-25; < Neo-Latin lōrum, special use of Latin lōrum thong, strap
Dictionary.com Unabridged
Based on the Random House Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2014.
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Examples from the web for lore
  • Conversely, common lore is that when the body gets chilled, it is more vulnerable to illness.
  • It is often argued that more lore attaches to chocolate than to any other human consumable except wine.
  • Pop psych lore is a bewildering mix of fact and fallacy.
  • According to industry lore, the case was good for business.
  • The lore holds that elephants can get drunk by eating the fermented fruit rotting on the ground.
  • lore has it that its unusual location was chosen by citizens frustrated by the powerful bishopric's reluctance to cede them land.
  • The startup lore says that many companies were founded in garages, attics, and warehouses.
  • Happened to my mom, according to family lore: my younger sister had a little brother who was stillborn.
  • According to lore, people can fulfill a dream if they touch the foot of the statue after going around it three times clockwise.
  • Interests, habits and lore accrue in families and shape those born into them.
British Dictionary definitions for lore

lore1

/lɔː/
noun
1.
collective knowledge or wisdom on a particular subject, esp of a traditional nature
2.
knowledge or learning
3.
(archaic) teaching, or something that is taught
Word Origin
Old English lār; related to leornian to learn

lore2

/lɔː/
noun
1.
the surface of the head of a bird between the eyes and the base of the bill
2.
the corresponding area in a snake or fish
Word Origin
C19: from New Latin lōrum, from Latin: strap
Collins English Dictionary - Complete & Unabridged 2012 Digital Edition
© William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1979, 1986 © HarperCollins
Publishers 1998, 2000, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2012
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Word Origin and History for lore
n.

Old English lar "learning, what is taught, knowledge, science, doctrine, art of teaching," from Proto-Germanic *laizo (Old Saxon lera, Old Frisian lare, Middle Dutch lere, Dutch leer, Old High German lera, German Lehre "teaching, precept, doctrine"), from PIE *leis- (see learn).

Online Etymology Dictionary, © 2010 Douglas Harper
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lore in Technology


1. Object-oriented language for knowledge representation. "Etude et Realisation d'un Language Objet: LORE", Y. Caseau, These, Paris-Sud, Nov 1987.
2. CGE, Marcoussis, France. Set-based language [same as 1?] E-mail: Christophe Dony

The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing, © Denis Howe 2010 http://foldoc.org
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